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29

Wednesday

12:00

Shapes of Free Fall

Gresham College: Museum of London

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The shapes of the orbits of many planets and comets orbiting their mother-ship stars are well known to be circles or ellipses (an idea that was explained by Isaac Newton). But we now understand that, depending on the history and the energy of the orbiting system, other geometric shapes are possible and indeed frequently observed.  This talk will explore how simple changes to the circumstances can make dramatic differences to the shapes of the orbits, all of which belong to a special family of shapes known as the conic sections.No reservations are required for this lecture. It will be run on a ‘first come, first served’ basis. Doors will open 30 minutes before the start of the lecture

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12:00

Conversion to Islam in Multicultural South Korea and the Struggle for Belonging: Korean Muslim Women's Perspectives

SOAS: Paul Webley Wing (Senate House) Room: S312

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Abstract This paper presents the first major ethnographic study on indigenous Korean Muslim converts documenting their struggles for identity, community and belonging. Conversion to Islam and subsequent inter-marriage with Muslim migrant workers, poses several challenges to static notions of Korean identities and this society’s multicultural future. To this end, I will present specific case studies documenting Korean Muslim journeys as they are racialized through their conversion trajectories including their marriage choices, first finding themselves unexpectedly otherised and finally ostracized. This leads many to reposition themselves as minorities, particularly in the case of hijab-wearing Korean women. By focusing on a Muslim minority community outside of a western context, this research will help to enrich the literature on Asian Islam and Muslim minorities, encouraging researchers to take a wider lens when discussing Muslims at the margins of both society and scholarship.

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12:00

The Lost Girl: artist tour – 29 January

Kings College: Bush House Arcade

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As part of The Lost Girl programme, King's academic and artist Dr Kate McMillan will give tours of the exhibition in the Arcade at Bush House. McMillan will discuss the themes of the exhibition and invite discussion of her work. Tours take place on 29 January, 13 February and 27 February from 13.00 - 13.45 and can be booked here.   The Lost Girl 13 January – 28 February 2020 | Monday – Friday, 12.00 – 17.00 The Lost Girl is an exhibition by Kate McMillan presented by the Department of Culture, Media and Creative Industries at King’s College London with funding from the Australia Council for the Arts; Arts Council England and the Arts & Humanities Research Institute at King’s. The exhibition and events programme is supported by the university’s Culture team. Follow @CulturalKings on Twitter and Instagram. #KingsCulturalCommunity #TheLostGirl #KateMcMillan

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12:00

Monitoring freshwaters in the UK – the value of citizen scientists

Kings College: Bush House North East Wing, Strand Campus

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Speaker: Dr Bill Brierly (Freshwater Biological Association) Abstract: Citizens have been monitoring the environment for many years, not least our freshwaters. Freshwater environments are some of the most threatened habitats on the planet and biodiversity is declining more rapidly in freshwaters than in any other biome. The value of the information collected by volunteers has been questioned by scientists, regulators and managers for many years but it is now seen as crucial to provide information and more detailed insights into the multiple pressures acting on the environment and options for sustainable management. This talk will be illustrated with various examples of citizen science monitoring of freshwater environments. *If you are external to King's and would like to attend this event, please contact the event organiser directly. About the speaker Dr Bill Brierly, Chief Executive at Freshwater Biological Association, is a professionally qualified and highly competent freshwater ecologist and leader. He has gained significant experience in strategic development and delivery, influencing, business and financial planning during nearly 29 years in the Environment Agency and its predecessors. Bill has extensive knowledge of ecology, ecosystem services, systems thinking, eutrophication, catchment management, water resources, environmental monitoring and assessment and water legislation resulting from his research, career and interests. More recently, Bill has worked on the Environment  Agency Monitoring programmes, including harmonising and redesigning the water networks and developing methods for assessing eutrophication using a Weight of Evidence approach. He has also been a lecturer at the Open University, an external examiner for the Aquatic Resource Management MSc at Kings College London and Chair and trustee of various charities across education, music and conservation.

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12:30

Against the National Grain: Maktoob and the Arabic-Hebrew Bi-national and Bilingual Team Translation Model

Kings College: Strand Campus

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Maktoob and Language Acts and Worldmaking invites you to Against the National Grain: Maktoob and the Arabic-Hebrew Bi-national and Bilingual Team Translation Model, a  free public seminar taking place at King’s College London on Wednesday 29 January 2020 from 13.30.  Programme 13.30 Opening Words Maktoob and Language Acts and Worldmaking 13.45 – 15.15 Panel: Translation in the Conflict Zone Chair: Julian Weiss (King’s College London, Language Acts and Worldmaking) Yehouda Shenhav-Shahrabani (Tel Aviv University), ‘Neoclassical Bias in Translation’ Chana Morgenstern (University of Cambridge), ‘What is Anti-colonial Translation?’ Yuval Evri (King’s College London, Language Acts and Worldmaking), ‘Multilingualism and Translation in a Nationalistic Era’ Discussant: AbdoolKarim Vakil (King’s College London, Language Acts and Worldmaking) 15.15 – 15.45 Afternoon tea break 15.45 – 17.15 Panel: Why Bilingual? Why Bi-national? Maktoob and the Politics of Translation Chair: Rachel Scott (King’s College London, Language Acts and Worldmaking) Yonatan Mendel (Ben-Gurion University) ‘Collective Translation on the Ground’ Eyad Barghouty (Tel Aviv University) Translation as Resistance Kifah Abdul Halim (Journalist, translator and producer) ‘Undercutting Political Boundaries’ Discussant: Catherine Boyle (King’s College London, Language Acts and Worldmaking) 17.15 – 18.00 Readings Readings from Journal of Levantine Studies special issue on the Maktoob translations To register, please email languageacts@kcl.ac.uk, giving your name and institutional affiliation, by Wednesday 22 January 2020.

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13:00

Virtual Realities

Wellcome Collection: We’ll be in the Forum. To get there, take the lift or stairs up to level 1 and then follow the signs through the ‘Being Human’ gallery.

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What you’ll doCome and hear clinical psychologist Lucia Valmaggia talk about her work using virtual reality technology to address mental health issues, such as preventing psychosis and supporting victims of bullying. You’ll also get a chance to ask Lucia questions about her fascinating research.

13:00

HEA Professional Recognition Workshop: Introduction to application (UAL Staff)

University of the Arts London: Room HH209

event:book

14:00

English Medieval Shrines Lost and Found

Guildhall Library: Guildhall Library, Aldermanbury, London, EC2V 7HH

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Saints’ shrines were once one of the glories of English medieval decorative arts.

14:00

Vignettes on Social Reproduction: Gender, Empire and Capital in an Egyptian Century

SOAS: Russell Square: College Buildings Room: 4426

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This paper looks at the idea of social reproduction in the context of Egypt, from the founding of Egypt's postcolonial state to the beginning of Egypt’s neoliberal project in the 1970s. Social reproduction, initially conceptualised as a Marxist feminist framework for understanding the unpaid work that goes into reproducing both the household and the labour force, asked the famous question: ‘If labour produces the commodity, who produces labour?’ Challenging the tendency of orthodox Marxist scholarship to ignore the importance of unpaid labour – often done by women – to the evolution of capitalism, social reproduction as a theory made a crucial intervention into Marxist analysis. Nevertheless, its emphasis on gender as the primary means of understanding social reproduction meant that it became a narrow approach to the question of unpaid labour and capitalist exploitation. We aim here to critically analyse the intersecting social structures that come together around social reproduction, building on the Black feminist tradition and the Italian autonomous feminist tradition: in particular Claudia Jones’s concept of ‘triple oppression’, to read how colonialism, class and gender come together at different points in Egyptian history; and Silvia Federici’s analytical approach that takes imperialism as central to the workings of social reproduction. Social reproduction and empire in an Egyptian century

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14:00

Smell, Games, Art and Well-being

University of the Arts London: LVMH L003 Lecture Theatre

event:book

14:00

Race, Empire and Economics: A seminar on Liberal International Theory

Kings College: Bush House North East Wing, Strand Campus

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Contemporary economics speaks about trade in the familiar abstractions of comparative advantage, tracing the modern formulation of the case for free trade made in terms of welfare maximization to late-Victorian economists like W. Stanley Jevons and Alfred Marshall. Though Jevons and Marshall did formalise theories that treat counties as if they are isolated individuals, with a set of production possibilities and demand curves that shape the possibilities for specialisation and exchange, a closer reading suggests that both took empire and the colonial division of labour for granted and that their thinking on trade was informed by colonial imaginaries of civilisation and race. A close reading of early neoclassical economists generally reveals that they offer a variant of liberal international theory largely ignored by current work in international political theory. Ignoring these figures risks forming the canon of international theory according to contemporary disciplinary boundaries anachronistically extended back in time and reinforcing indefensible separations of economics and politics/culture. This event is organized by the King’s Decolonizing Working Group.

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14:15

Education and Race in Black and Asian Communities in Britain: An Archival Study

SOAS: Paul Webley Wing (Senate House) Room: SOAS Paul Webley Wing (Senate House), Room S113

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This paper explores the experience of racism and the formation of ‘Black’ and ‘Asian’ identities in the educational projects of African, Caribbean and Asian youths in the UK. It is part of the British Sociological Association’s (BSA) initiative to highlight the benefits of archival research in sociology. As a result, the BSA has partnered with the British Library (BL) to establish the ‘Sociology in the archives’ project. The project is informed by the ‘archival turn’ (Moore et al. 2016) in sociology which has seen increasing numbers of sociologists employing archival research methods to examine contemporary concerns. Accordingly, the project employs the BL’s collections, including literary accounts, personal testimonies from oral histories, theatre and zines (independent, self-published materials) from the UK’s African, Caribbean and Asian communities to examine race and education from the 1960s to present day. The paper will discuss key themes emerging from the archival materials such as how particular racist imaginaries and structural inequalities shaped young people’s negative experiences of schooling, the importance of alternative knowledge, skills and histories as part of people’s educational projects and Community-led campaigns, and programmes to address what people felt was missing from mainstream schooling. By thinking through these themes, the paper asks how ‘African’ and ‘Asian’ histories and culture are employed by ‘Black’ (African and Caribbean), and Asian youth in their pursuit of educational projects that spoke to their lived experiences as racialised minorities.

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14:30

HIV/Host interactions in the immunopathogenesis and pandemic spread of HIV-1

Kings College: Guy’s Campus

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Permissivity and reprogramming during HIV-1 infection of T cells Dr Clare Jolly, Division of Infection and Immunity, UCL.   What's so special about the pandemic strain of HIV and what does this tell us about mechanisms of innate immunity and inflammation Professor Greg Towers, Division of Infection and Immunity, UCL.     This month we have Professor Greg Towers and Dr Clare Jolly from UCL giving back-to-back presentations on their research interests in HIV/AIDS. Greg’s primary interests are how the virus avoids host innate pattern recognition processes and how this evasion has shaped primate lentivirus evolution and the HIV-1 pandemic. Clare is a cell biologist with a particular interest in how the virus hijacks the ability of primary T cells to form immune synapses to foster its spread within the infected individual. As many of you may know, the School is looking to expand our infection research at present, and both Professor Towers and Dr Jolly are considering whether to bring their labs to KCL. The showcase is a great opportunity for you to meet them and the respective groups, and find out about their long term research interests.

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15:00

Brazil and its language policies: round table

Kings College: King's Building, Strand Campus

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How have contemporary Brazilian governments dealt with policies regarding the Portuguese language in Brazil and abroad? This round table will discuss the impact of migration and Portuguese as an additional language in Brazil. It will also cover Brazil's language policy abroad in different conjunctures. Round table members: Gabriela da Silva Bulla (Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil) Leandro Diniz (Federal University of Minas Gerais, Brazil)

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15:00

The battle for a beach: Blue legalities, wet ontologies and coastal conflict

Kings College: Bush House North East Wing, Strand Campus

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Speaker: Professor Phil Hubbard (King's College London) This seminar will be followed by a drinks reception. *If you are external to King's and would like to attend this event, please contact the event organiser directly. About the speaker Phil Hubbard is Professor of Urban Studies in the Department of Geography, King's College London. He is particularly interested in the city as a site of social conflict. His work draws on theories of the city developed in urban geography and urban sociology, and also engages with debates in socio-legal studies given my particular interests in the way urban 'disorder' is regulated.

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15:00

Immersive Virtual Reality: Moral dilemmas, aggression, &…

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Abstract: In moral psychology people often use theoretical vignettes to assess moral decision making. In these types of studies, people are asked to imagine and emergency situation – for example to kill one person in order to save five people – and to then rate how morally acceptable they would regard this action and if they would be likely to do it. These experiments however have low ecological validity and might be confounded with social desirability biases. We re-created the traditional footbridge dilemma in Immersive Virtual Reality (IVR) and found that participants significantly more endorsed the action, even if they regarded it as morally unacceptable.

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15:00

Brexit, Empire, and Questions of ‘National Inheritance

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The last few years have seen an intensification in the debates around reclaiming our ‘national sovereignty’ and identifying those who are deemed to have a ‘legitimate’ claim to the benefits of British citizenship. These debates are predicated on the idea of Britain having been a nation and that national assets have been built up endogenously to be passed on as an ‘inheritance’ to future citizens. The boundaries of who should have access to these assets – particularly in terms of welfare and citizenship – are increasingly policed. Indeed, in broader debates on migration, many scholars argue that if migration is to be allowed then those who come should not have access to full citizenship as this would be viewed as unfair by local citizens. This is because, as Branko Milanovic argues, rich countries accumulate wealth and transmit it, along with other advantages, to subsequent generations of citizens and, specifically, for the enjoyment of its national citizens. But, if, as I’ve long argued, Britain has always been an imperial state, not a national one – collecting taxes from across the empire and not just the nation – then questions both of ‘national sovereignty’ and ‘national inheritance’ require further interrogation. Brexit, I suggest, has illuminated unresolved issues of who constitutes the body politic and whose concerns should legitimately constitute the basis for public policy initiatives.

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15:30

Two Types of Autism in Borges by Adam Feinstein

Kings College: Virginia Woolf Building, Strand Campus

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Come join the King's AHRI Centre for Humanities & Health first seminar of 2020 on Borges and autism. Following his presentation with Jorge Luis Borges' widow, María Kodama, in Argentina last year, in this talk the autism historian and researcher, poet and film critic, Adam Feinstein, will discuss his hypothesis that Borges - in his 1944 story Funes el Memorioso - was depicting not just one but two types of autism, without realising the precise nature of the condition he was describing  Feinstein will then analyse other possible early portrayals of autism in literature, as well as the representations and mis-representations of autism in the cinema.

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15:30

Taking (and leaving) hints: Joseph Addison’s classicism

Kings College: Virginia Woolf Building, Strand Campus

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Professor Paul Davis (UCL) presents the Department of Comparative Literature Research Seminar Recent work on classicism in England during the long eighteenth century, moving away from the agonistic Bloomian paradigm of 'anxiety of influence', has turned to more sociable or collaborative models for classical reception, in particular that of dialogue or conversation. As a leading advocate of polite sociability in The Spectator, and also a critic, imitator and translator of classical verse, Joseph Addison potentially embodies that interactive model. This paper explores Addison’s lifelong fascination with one aspect of polite conversation – namely, hinting – as the bridge between his classicism and his thinking about sociability. The paper argues that, while as a critic in his celebrated Spectator essays on Paradise Lost, Addison regularly praised Milton for 'taking' or 'improving' hints from the ancients, in his own practice as a translator he was more reticent. The paper concludes with an analysis of Addison’s version of Horace, Odes III. iii, little-known nowadays but long regarded as a landmark in the tradition of English Horatianism. It represents, I will argue, Addison’s masterpiece of leaving hints.  All are welcome to attend. No registration required.

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16:00

Architecture & Violence

The Courtauld Institute of Art: Research Forum Seminar Room , Vernon Square, Penton Rise, Kings Cross, London, WC1X 9EW

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Prompted by President Trump’s threat to bomb heritage sites in Iran, architectural historians at The Courtauld offer a ‘long view’ on the destruction of architecture and heritage in a series of lightning talks. Exploring ideas of iconoclasm, ‘warchitecture’, memory, violence and renewal, papers will consider architectural destruction from the sixteenth century to the present. Part of the Architecture Cluster’s Series of events.

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16:00

Reading Material Reading Life: Bene Israel, Colonial Modernity and Jewish Marathi- English Print Culture in Bombay (1859-1930)

SOAS: Paul Webley Wing (Senate House) Room: Wolfson Lecture Theatre

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Abstract In the mid- 18th century, a little-known community of Marathi-speaking Jews of India ,the Bene-Israel,  who had lived in isolation in Konkan region of Maharashtra for centuries, moved to Bombay for employment and educational opportunities offered by the British rule. Bombay had, by then, developed into a colonial metropolis with a bustling port city witnessing an unfolding of colonial modernity. They took up minor jobs as masons, carpenters, electricians and worked at shipyards leaving behind their traditional trade of oil-pressing. They also enlisted themselves into military services  as “Native Jew Caste” as evident in some 18th century writings by European observers. In 1796, the  first Bene Israel synagogue was built by Samaji Hassaji(or Samuel)Divekar (d.1797), a subedar in a British native regiment and benefactor of the community in Bombay.

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16:00

What should I wear with my tape-recorder? Aurality, mobility and sound technology in postwar Japan

SOAS: Russell Square: College Buildings Room: Djam Lecture Theatre (DLT)

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Abstract This talk provides an introduction to the hobby of sound hunting (Namaroku) in Japan. The boom in popularity of sound recording as a hobby began in the late 1960s and faded out by the early 1980s. Yet, drawing on efforts since the 1950s to create documentary sound and produce sound effects, as well as a growing fascination for recording the sounds of nature, everyday life and modern technology, the ‘Namaroku boom’ took the amateur enthusiast beyond the domestic realm where the capturing of music and conversation had been the focus of sound recording culture up to the late 1960s. In magazines, handbooks, and manufacturers’ advertising campaigns young Japanese were urged to go out and about with a tape recorder to find, research and create ‘real sound’. This was part of a broader global transformation that saw the consumption and control of sound through technological mediation gradually taken out of the hands of experts. The promotion of ‘sound hunting’ tied the consumption of sound to consumer society and created a mediascape that emphasised individualism, mobility and experimentation in relation to the everyday soundscape. This paper explores the wider social and cultural contexts within which sound and sound recording technology resonated in postwar Japan and offers an important case study for the role of technology and consumerism in sound studies.

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16:00

Reconstructing the Poet’s Image through Institutional Translation —a Case Study of Rewi Alley’s Translation of Li Bai’s Poems

SOAS: Brunei Gallery Room: B103

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Speaker: Professor Huijuan Ma (Beijing Foreign Studies University) Abstract

16:00

Innovation Bureaucracies: How agile stability creates the entrepreneurial state

SOAS: Paul Webley Wing (Senate House) Room: SALT

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The talk will focus on how to (re-)define what entrepreneurial states are: namely, these are states that are capable of unleashing innovations and wealth resulting from those, and of maintaining socio-political stability at the same time. Innovation bureaucracies are constellations of public organisations that deliver such agile stability. Such balancing act makes public bureaucracies unique in how they work, succeed and fail. The talk looks at the historical evolution of innovation bureaucracy by focusing on public organisations dealing with knowledge and technology, economic development and growth; and briefly show how agility and stability are delivered through starkly different bureaucratic organisations. Hence, what matters for capacity and capabilities are not single organisations but organisational configurations and how they evolve.

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16:00

Letters from across the Arabian Sea : Imdadullah Makki and the North Indian ulama in the 19th century

SOAS: Russell Square: College Buildings Room: G3

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Organiser: Dr Roy Fischel Contact email: rf26@soas.ac.uk

16:00

Gender and Media

SOAS: Faber Building, 23/24 Russell Square Room: FG01

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The Iraqi media landscape is defined by concerns that have afflicted the country over the last century, namely conflict, violence, geopolitics and corruption. The mainstream media landscape now reflects political narratives of the state and political actors, providing a tool for control and violence. Newsroom hierarchies and organisational structures reflect this politicised landscape; issues related to gender equality and women’s rights remain contested. This politicisation coupled with the rising influence of non-state actors on the political scene, such as ISIS or paramilitary groups across Iraq, sees threats to journalists on the increase. Online harassment of female journalists is reported with alarming regularity. Cases where journalists have been discriminated against and excluded on a gender basis are many. This lecture will provide insight into the structural conditions that are impacting on the development of content for and by women. Based on interviews with media practitioners and focus groups with audiences across Iraq, May – October 2019, it will examine the extent to which Iraqi women are playing a role in the creation and dissemination of media content and identify the main obstacles to equal access and participation of women in the media.

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16:00

Intellectual Property and Gender

Kings College: Somerset House East Wing, Strand Campus

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Over the past several decades, gender studies have attracted the attention of scholars in numerous areas of law, mainly in criminal law, family law, human rights, employment law, tax, and business law. However, only recently have legal scholars started to look at gender issues in intellectual property laws. For instance, copyright historically focused on the ‘fine arts’, including sculpture, music, painting and literature, areas that were dominated by men, while ‘domestic crafts’ such as needlework, traditional fiber arts and knitting, associated with women and home handicraft, fell outside of copyrightable subject matter in the past. Although the social views on gender and IP laws have changed a lot, empirical research demonstrated that latent gender bias, especially in patenting, still remains. In this session, we will investigate whether intellectual property has a gender, how gender insights from non-IP doctrine can be applied to bridge the gender gap in IP, and measures on ensuring equitable systems of encouraging innovation and creativity. Reading: Dan L Burk, ‘Bridging the Gender Gap in Intellectual Property’ (2018) WIPO MagazineInmaculada de Melo-Martín, ‘Patenting and the Gender Gap: Should Women Be Encouraged to Patent More?’ (2013) 19 Science and Engineering Ethics 491. Available atAnn Bartow, ‘Fair Use and the Fairer Sex: Gender, Feminism, and Copyright Law’ (2006) 14 American University Journal of Gender, Social Policy & the Law 551Additional Reading: Katharine T Bartlett, Deborah L Rhode and Joanna L Grossman, Gender and Law: Theory, Doctrine, Commentary (7th edn, Aspen Casebook 2016) M R Kirkwood, ‘Equality of Property Interests Between Husband and Wife’ (1923-1924) 8 Minn L Rev 579Wendy Syfret, ‘how women are changing the world with textiles’ i-D Vice (14 November 2016)Kevin J Greene, ‘Intellectual Property at the Intersection of Race and Gender: Lady Sings the Blues’ (2008) 16 American University Journal of Gender, Social Policy & the Law 365. Available at

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16:00

Risk and Education

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Risk is central to some education research, namely research looking at the construction of children and young people as vulnerable or ‘at-risk’ and research documenting the impact of students’ engagement in forms of adventure learning, sometimes called ‘risky play’. But the literature is conceptually limited. In this presentation I adopt a governmentality perspective to develop a theoretical strategy to understanding schools as risk institutions and the importance of risk to consolidating market discipline and monopoly governance as techniques for restoring public trust.

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16:00

Goldsmiths Writers' Centre presents Three Poets

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Three poets Mimi Khalvati, Peter Daniels and Cathy Galvin

16:15

Tracing Patterns of Textiles in Ancient Java (8th-15th century)

SOAS: Russell Square: College Buildings Room: 4426

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Abstract The lecture provides an overview of the repertoire of textile-related patterns found on Ancient Javanese art and architecture, dated from 8th-15th century. The patterns, impressed upon stone and metal surfaces, enrich temple walls and the attire of Hindu-Buddhist deities and royalty. The lack of surviving textile material from this early period makes these patterns useful for tracing different types of textiles that may have existed in Ancient Java. Upon close scrutiny, however, the pattern’s veracity as a literal representation of an actual fabric can be called into question. Rather, the textile designs can be seen as a sculptor’s response to international styles. One example is a particular pattern found on a group of panels on the exterior walls of Candi Sewu, an eighth-century Buddhist temple in Central Java, which will be examined in detail.

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16:15

Urban geopolitics and the figure of the immigrant in Europe

SOAS: Russell Square: College Buildings Room: Khalili Lecture Theatre (KLT)

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Further details to follow. The events are free and open to the public. Registration is not required.

16:30

Cosimo I de’Medici and Granducal Florence

School of Advanced Study: Warburg Institute, Woburn Square, London WC1H 0AB

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Jonathan Davies (University of Warwick): '"He was supremely an imitator of [them]": Cosimo I, Cosimo the Elder, and Lorenzo the Magnificent' Contemporaries noted the fascination of Cosimo I with his ancestors Cosimo the Elder and Lorenzo the Magnificent.  This paper will examine that attraction and discuss possible influences of his fifteenth-century ancestors on the first grand duke of Tuscany. Gemma Cornetti (Warburg Institute): 'Engraved Portraits for the Medici'  Throughout his lifetime, Duke Cosimo I de’ Medici gave attention, unprecedented in the history of the Medici family, to the commissioning of portraits of himself and his ancestors in various artistic media. In contrast to painted and sculpted portraits, portrait prints bearing his likeness, and issued when he was alive, did not stem from his direct commission - Cosimo was largely a recipient of them. In this paper, by focusing on these portrait prints, I aim to challenge modern concepts applied to portraiture such as ‘self-fashioning’, ‘self-projection’ or ‘propaganda’, and stress the greater role of printmakers and courtiers in the construction and dissemination of Cosimo’s likeness. Cosimo I de’ Medici (1519-1574), first Grandduke of Tuscany, was both a consummate administrator and a fierce patron of the arts. The lecture series Cosimo I De’Medici and Granducal Florence celebrates the 500th anniversary of Cosimo I de’ Medici’s birth by bringing together scholars from across the humanities to discuss Cosimo’s achievements in art, architecture, statecraft, scholarship and culture. Pairs of scholars will offer specialist discussions over the course of six evenings, from June 2019 to January 2020. Evenings will be devoted to issues of diplomacy and spying, architectural and artistic commissions, the development of universities and libraries, as well as Cosimo’s personal learning and self-representation.   FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC, AND FOLLOWED BY A WINE RECEPTION.

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16:30

Contemporary Art Talk: Marianna Simnett

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Marianna Simnett makes makes films, installations, drawings and sculptures about bodies and their potential for transformation. Simnett’s bodies are mutants and hybrids, playing dangerous games to deadly limits. They faint, they undergo medical procedures, they die and they come back to life. Unflinching and raw, Simnett uncovers the parts of ourselves that usually remain concealed.

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17:00

Brazil in translation

Kings College: King's Building, Strand Campus

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Join the Brazil Institute for an evening of lusophone prose, poetry and drama. Through a series of reading and discussions, we'll be exploring the beauty, wonder and challenges of translating from the Portuguese. Speakers include: Margaret Jull Costa (renowned translator) Almiro Andrade (director and translator)   About the speakers Margaret Jull Costa, OBE, is a multi-award-winning translator. She has worked on writers, such as Jose Saramago, Eça de Queiroz, Fernando Pessoa, Paulo Coelho and Michel Laub. Almiro Andrade, PhD, is a director, academic and translator. His work encompasses English adaptations of Namibia Não! (by Aldri Anunciação), and The Blind One and The Mad One (by Claudia Barral).

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17:00

Book Launch event for Paolo Savoia with Renaissance Skin

Kings College: Anatomy Museum

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Book Launch: ‘Gaspare Tagliacozzi and Early Modern Surgery: Faces, Men, and Pain’, by Paolo Savoia Join us for the launch event of the English edition of Paolo Savoia’s new book. Paolo will be joined by Evelyn Welch and Elaine Leong (UCL) to introduce his publication, which examines the work of Bolognese physician and anatomist Gaspare Tagliacozzi to explore the social and cultural history of early modern surgery. Gaspare Tagliacozzi and Early Modern Surgery: Faces, Men, and Pain discusses how Italian and European surgeons' attitudes to health and beauty – and how patients' gender – shaped views on the public appearance of the human body. The event will be accompanied by a drinks reception. Please meet at the Strand Campus reception at 17:50 to be taken up to the Anatomy Museum, if external to King's.

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17:30

How To Save Our Democracies? (A Rethinking the Public event, featuring Rick Edwards, Peter MacLeod, and Neal Lawson)

Queen Mary: People's Palace - Skeel Lecture Theatre

event:book

17:30

Taking the Country's Side: Architecture and Agriculture

Architectural Association: 33 First Floor Back

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Given the environmental predicament which is now ours, our core hypothesis is that no sound reasoning will develop on the future of agriculture and architecture, which both emerged as the twin fairies of the Neolithic revolution (and thereafter of the Anthropocene), unless those two fields of concerns are reconnected and fundamentally rethought in conjunction to one another. Our intention is thus to deeply question the growing divorce and estrangement of the two disciplines, as it was initiated by the scientific revolution (and its so-called mastery and domination of nature), pronounced by the spread of market economy, and consecrated by the industrial era, which precipitated both into the parallel dead-ends of metropolitan congestion and monocultural deserts. Taking the Country’s Side extends to architects, as well as to all those concerned by the current evolution of our living environments, an invitation to leave their metropolitan niche, their zones of professional comfort and smartness, and literally “take a walk on the wild side”. For now several decades, it so happens that several individuals and communities, committed to enacting alternatives to the deleterious processes of industrial agriculture and market economy (under the name of permaculture, social ecology, agroforestry, bioregionalism or agroecology), have evolved a treasure trove of ideas and principles that significantly challenge the core concepts of architecture and urbanism today. As a poetics of reason for the Anthropocene, this practical wisdom is in our view more relevant than what Academia usually has to offer, and way more pointed than what currently circulates under the name of “architectural theory“.

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17:30

Writers: Paving the Way to an Inclusive Future – Panel Discussion

University of the Arts London: London College of Communication

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18:30

The Future of Television: Creating an Inclusive World – Panel Discussion

University of the Arts London: London College of Communication

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12:00
Shapes of Free Fall

Gresham College:Museum of London

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The shapes of the orbits of many planets and comets orbiting their mother-ship stars are well known to be circles or ellipses (an idea that was explained by Isaac Newton). But we now understand that, depending on the history and the energy of the orbiting system, other geometric shapes are possible and indeed frequently observed.  This talk will explore how simple changes to the circumstances can make dramatic differences to the shapes of the orbits, all of which belong to a special family of shapes known as the conic sections.No reservations are required for this lecture. It will be run on a ‘first come, first served’ basis. Doors will open 30 minutes before the start of the lecture

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12:00
Conversion to Islam in Multicultural South Korea and the Struggle for Belonging: Korean Muslim Women's Perspectives

SOAS:Paul Webley Wing (Senate House) Room: S312

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Abstract This paper presents the first major ethnographic study on indigenous Korean Muslim converts documenting their struggles for identity, community and belonging. Conversion to Islam and subsequent inter-marriage with Muslim migrant workers, poses several challenges to static notions of Korean identities and this society’s multicultural future. To this end, I will present specific case studies documenting Korean Muslim journeys as they are racialized through their conversion trajectories including their marriage choices, first finding themselves unexpectedly otherised and finally ostracized. This leads many to reposition themselves as minorities, particularly in the case of hijab-wearing Korean women. By focusing on a Muslim minority community outside of a western context, this research will help to enrich the literature on Asian Islam and Muslim minorities, encouraging researchers to take a wider lens when discussing Muslims at the margins of both society and scholarship.

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12:00
The Lost Girl: artist tour – 29 January

Kings College:Bush House Arcade

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As part of The Lost Girl programme, King's academic and artist Dr Kate McMillan will give tours of the exhibition in the Arcade at Bush House. McMillan will discuss the themes of the exhibition and invite discussion of her work. Tours take place on 29 January, 13 February and 27 February from 13.00 - 13.45 and can be booked here.   The Lost Girl 13 January – 28 February 2020 | Monday – Friday, 12.00 – 17.00 The Lost Girl is an exhibition by Kate McMillan presented by the Department of Culture, Media and Creative Industries at King’s College London with funding from the Australia Council for the Arts; Arts Council England and the Arts & Humanities Research Institute at King’s. The exhibition and events programme is supported by the university’s Culture team. Follow @CulturalKings on Twitter and Instagram. #KingsCulturalCommunity #TheLostGirl #KateMcMillan

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12:00
Monitoring freshwaters in the UK – the value of citizen scientists

Kings College:Bush House North East Wing, Strand Campus

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Speaker: Dr Bill Brierly (Freshwater Biological Association) Abstract: Citizens have been monitoring the environment for many years, not least our freshwaters. Freshwater environments are some of the most threatened habitats on the planet and biodiversity is declining more rapidly in freshwaters than in any other biome. The value of the information collected by volunteers has been questioned by scientists, regulators and managers for many years but it is now seen as crucial to provide information and more detailed insights into the multiple pressures acting on the environment and options for sustainable management. This talk will be illustrated with various examples of citizen science monitoring of freshwater environments. *If you are external to King's and would like to attend this event, please contact the event organiser directly. About the speaker Dr Bill Brierly, Chief Executive at Freshwater Biological Association, is a professionally qualified and highly competent freshwater ecologist and leader. He has gained significant experience in strategic development and delivery, influencing, business and financial planning during nearly 29 years in the Environment Agency and its predecessors. Bill has extensive knowledge of ecology, ecosystem services, systems thinking, eutrophication, catchment management, water resources, environmental monitoring and assessment and water legislation resulting from his research, career and interests. More recently, Bill has worked on the Environment  Agency Monitoring programmes, including harmonising and redesigning the water networks and developing methods for assessing eutrophication using a Weight of Evidence approach. He has also been a lecturer at the Open University, an external examiner for the Aquatic Resource Management MSc at Kings College London and Chair and trustee of various charities across education, music and conservation.

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12:30
Against the National Grain: Maktoob and the Arabic-Hebrew Bi-national and Bilingual Team Translation Model

Kings College:Strand Campus

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Maktoob and Language Acts and Worldmaking invites you to Against the National Grain: Maktoob and the Arabic-Hebrew Bi-national and Bilingual Team Translation Model, a  free public seminar taking place at King’s College London on Wednesday 29 January 2020 from 13.30.  Programme 13.30 Opening Words Maktoob and Language Acts and Worldmaking 13.45 – 15.15 Panel: Translation in the Conflict Zone Chair: Julian Weiss (King’s College London, Language Acts and Worldmaking) Yehouda Shenhav-Shahrabani (Tel Aviv University), ‘Neoclassical Bias in Translation’ Chana Morgenstern (University of Cambridge), ‘What is Anti-colonial Translation?’ Yuval Evri (King’s College London, Language Acts and Worldmaking), ‘Multilingualism and Translation in a Nationalistic Era’ Discussant: AbdoolKarim Vakil (King’s College London, Language Acts and Worldmaking) 15.15 – 15.45 Afternoon tea break 15.45 – 17.15 Panel: Why Bilingual? Why Bi-national? Maktoob and the Politics of Translation Chair: Rachel Scott (King’s College London, Language Acts and Worldmaking) Yonatan Mendel (Ben-Gurion University) ‘Collective Translation on the Ground’ Eyad Barghouty (Tel Aviv University) Translation as Resistance Kifah Abdul Halim (Journalist, translator and producer) ‘Undercutting Political Boundaries’ Discussant: Catherine Boyle (King’s College London, Language Acts and Worldmaking) 17.15 – 18.00 Readings Readings from Journal of Levantine Studies special issue on the Maktoob translations To register, please email languageacts@kcl.ac.uk, giving your name and institutional affiliation, by Wednesday 22 January 2020.

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13:00
Virtual Realities

Wellcome Collection:We’ll be in the Forum. To get there, take the lift or stairs up to level 1 and then follow the signs through the ‘Being Human’ gallery.

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What you’ll doCome and hear clinical psychologist Lucia Valmaggia talk about her work using virtual reality technology to address mental health issues, such as preventing psychosis and supporting victims of bullying. You’ll also get a chance to ask Lucia questions about her fascinating research.

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13:00
HEA Professional Recognition Workshop: Introduction to application (UAL Staff)

University of the Arts London:Room HH209

event:book

14:00
English Medieval Shrines Lost and Found

Guildhall Library:Guildhall Library, Aldermanbury, London, EC2V 7HH

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Saints’ shrines were once one of the glories of English medieval decorative arts.

14:00
Vignettes on Social Reproduction: Gender, Empire and Capital in an Egyptian Century

SOAS:Russell Square: College Buildings Room: 4426

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This paper looks at the idea of social reproduction in the context of Egypt, from the founding of Egypt's postcolonial state to the beginning of Egypt’s neoliberal project in the 1970s. Social reproduction, initially conceptualised as a Marxist feminist framework for understanding the unpaid work that goes into reproducing both the household and the labour force, asked the famous question: ‘If labour produces the commodity, who produces labour?’ Challenging the tendency of orthodox Marxist scholarship to ignore the importance of unpaid labour – often done by women – to the evolution of capitalism, social reproduction as a theory made a crucial intervention into Marxist analysis. Nevertheless, its emphasis on gender as the primary means of understanding social reproduction meant that it became a narrow approach to the question of unpaid labour and capitalist exploitation. We aim here to critically analyse the intersecting social structures that come together around social reproduction, building on the Black feminist tradition and the Italian autonomous feminist tradition: in particular Claudia Jones’s concept of ‘triple oppression’, to read how colonialism, class and gender come together at different points in Egyptian history; and Silvia Federici’s analytical approach that takes imperialism as central to the workings of social reproduction. Social reproduction and empire in an Egyptian century

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14:00
Smell, Games, Art and Well-being

University of the Arts London:LVMH L003 Lecture Theatre

event:book

14:00
Race, Empire and Economics: A seminar on Liberal International Theory

Kings College:Bush House North East Wing, Strand Campus

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Contemporary economics speaks about trade in the familiar abstractions of comparative advantage, tracing the modern formulation of the case for free trade made in terms of welfare maximization to late-Victorian economists like W. Stanley Jevons and Alfred Marshall. Though Jevons and Marshall did formalise theories that treat counties as if they are isolated individuals, with a set of production possibilities and demand curves that shape the possibilities for specialisation and exchange, a closer reading suggests that both took empire and the colonial division of labour for granted and that their thinking on trade was informed by colonial imaginaries of civilisation and race. A close reading of early neoclassical economists generally reveals that they offer a variant of liberal international theory largely ignored by current work in international political theory. Ignoring these figures risks forming the canon of international theory according to contemporary disciplinary boundaries anachronistically extended back in time and reinforcing indefensible separations of economics and politics/culture. This event is organized by the King’s Decolonizing Working Group.

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14:15
Education and Race in Black and Asian Communities in Britain: An Archival Study

SOAS:Paul Webley Wing (Senate House) Room: SOAS Paul Webley Wing (Senate House), Room S113

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This paper explores the experience of racism and the formation of ‘Black’ and ‘Asian’ identities in the educational projects of African, Caribbean and Asian youths in the UK. It is part of the British Sociological Association’s (BSA) initiative to highlight the benefits of archival research in sociology. As a result, the BSA has partnered with the British Library (BL) to establish the ‘Sociology in the archives’ project. The project is informed by the ‘archival turn’ (Moore et al. 2016) in sociology which has seen increasing numbers of sociologists employing archival research methods to examine contemporary concerns. Accordingly, the project employs the BL’s collections, including literary accounts, personal testimonies from oral histories, theatre and zines (independent, self-published materials) from the UK’s African, Caribbean and Asian communities to examine race and education from the 1960s to present day. The paper will discuss key themes emerging from the archival materials such as how particular racist imaginaries and structural inequalities shaped young people’s negative experiences of schooling, the importance of alternative knowledge, skills and histories as part of people’s educational projects and Community-led campaigns, and programmes to address what people felt was missing from mainstream schooling. By thinking through these themes, the paper asks how ‘African’ and ‘Asian’ histories and culture are employed by ‘Black’ (African and Caribbean), and Asian youth in their pursuit of educational projects that spoke to their lived experiences as racialised minorities.

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14:30
HIV/Host interactions in the immunopathogenesis and pandemic spread of HIV-1

Kings College:Guy’s Campus

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Permissivity and reprogramming during HIV-1 infection of T cells Dr Clare Jolly, Division of Infection and Immunity, UCL.   What's so special about the pandemic strain of HIV and what does this tell us about mechanisms of innate immunity and inflammation Professor Greg Towers, Division of Infection and Immunity, UCL.     This month we have Professor Greg Towers and Dr Clare Jolly from UCL giving back-to-back presentations on their research interests in HIV/AIDS. Greg’s primary interests are how the virus avoids host innate pattern recognition processes and how this evasion has shaped primate lentivirus evolution and the HIV-1 pandemic. Clare is a cell biologist with a particular interest in how the virus hijacks the ability of primary T cells to form immune synapses to foster its spread within the infected individual. As many of you may know, the School is looking to expand our infection research at present, and both Professor Towers and Dr Jolly are considering whether to bring their labs to KCL. The showcase is a great opportunity for you to meet them and the respective groups, and find out about their long term research interests.

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15:00
Brazil and its language policies: round table

Kings College:King's Building, Strand Campus

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How have contemporary Brazilian governments dealt with policies regarding the Portuguese language in Brazil and abroad? This round table will discuss the impact of migration and Portuguese as an additional language in Brazil. It will also cover Brazil's language policy abroad in different conjunctures. Round table members: Gabriela da Silva Bulla (Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil) Leandro Diniz (Federal University of Minas Gerais, Brazil)

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15:00
The battle for a beach: Blue legalities, wet ontologies and coastal conflict

Kings College:Bush House North East Wing, Strand Campus

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Speaker: Professor Phil Hubbard (King's College London) This seminar will be followed by a drinks reception. *If you are external to King's and would like to attend this event, please contact the event organiser directly. About the speaker Phil Hubbard is Professor of Urban Studies in the Department of Geography, King's College London. He is particularly interested in the city as a site of social conflict. His work draws on theories of the city developed in urban geography and urban sociology, and also engages with debates in socio-legal studies given my particular interests in the way urban 'disorder' is regulated.

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15:00
Immersive Virtual Reality: Moral dilemmas, aggression, &…

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Abstract: In moral psychology people often use theoretical vignettes to assess moral decision making. In these types of studies, people are asked to imagine and emergency situation – for example to kill one person in order to save five people – and to then rate how morally acceptable they would regard this action and if they would be likely to do it. These experiments however have low ecological validity and might be confounded with social desirability biases. We re-created the traditional footbridge dilemma in Immersive Virtual Reality (IVR) and found that participants significantly more endorsed the action, even if they regarded it as morally unacceptable.

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15:00
Brexit, Empire, and Questions of ‘National Inheritance

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The last few years have seen an intensification in the debates around reclaiming our ‘national sovereignty’ and identifying those who are deemed to have a ‘legitimate’ claim to the benefits of British citizenship. These debates are predicated on the idea of Britain having been a nation and that national assets have been built up endogenously to be passed on as an ‘inheritance’ to future citizens. The boundaries of who should have access to these assets – particularly in terms of welfare and citizenship – are increasingly policed. Indeed, in broader debates on migration, many scholars argue that if migration is to be allowed then those who come should not have access to full citizenship as this would be viewed as unfair by local citizens. This is because, as Branko Milanovic argues, rich countries accumulate wealth and transmit it, along with other advantages, to subsequent generations of citizens and, specifically, for the enjoyment of its national citizens. But, if, as I’ve long argued, Britain has always been an imperial state, not a national one – collecting taxes from across the empire and not just the nation – then questions both of ‘national sovereignty’ and ‘national inheritance’ require further interrogation. Brexit, I suggest, has illuminated unresolved issues of who constitutes the body politic and whose concerns should legitimately constitute the basis for public policy initiatives.

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15:30
Two Types of Autism in Borges by Adam Feinstein

Kings College:Virginia Woolf Building, Strand Campus

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Come join the King's AHRI Centre for Humanities & Health first seminar of 2020 on Borges and autism. Following his presentation with Jorge Luis Borges' widow, María Kodama, in Argentina last year, in this talk the autism historian and researcher, poet and film critic, Adam Feinstein, will discuss his hypothesis that Borges - in his 1944 story Funes el Memorioso - was depicting not just one but two types of autism, without realising the precise nature of the condition he was describing  Feinstein will then analyse other possible early portrayals of autism in literature, as well as the representations and mis-representations of autism in the cinema.

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15:30
Taking (and leaving) hints: Joseph Addison’s classicism

Kings College:Virginia Woolf Building, Strand Campus

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Professor Paul Davis (UCL) presents the Department of Comparative Literature Research Seminar Recent work on classicism in England during the long eighteenth century, moving away from the agonistic Bloomian paradigm of 'anxiety of influence', has turned to more sociable or collaborative models for classical reception, in particular that of dialogue or conversation. As a leading advocate of polite sociability in The Spectator, and also a critic, imitator and translator of classical verse, Joseph Addison potentially embodies that interactive model. This paper explores Addison’s lifelong fascination with one aspect of polite conversation – namely, hinting – as the bridge between his classicism and his thinking about sociability. The paper argues that, while as a critic in his celebrated Spectator essays on Paradise Lost, Addison regularly praised Milton for 'taking' or 'improving' hints from the ancients, in his own practice as a translator he was more reticent. The paper concludes with an analysis of Addison’s version of Horace, Odes III. iii, little-known nowadays but long regarded as a landmark in the tradition of English Horatianism. It represents, I will argue, Addison’s masterpiece of leaving hints.  All are welcome to attend. No registration required.

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16:00
Architecture & Violence

The Courtauld Institute of Art:Research Forum Seminar Room , Vernon Square, Penton Rise, Kings Cross, London, WC1X 9EW

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Prompted by President Trump’s threat to bomb heritage sites in Iran, architectural historians at The Courtauld offer a ‘long view’ on the destruction of architecture and heritage in a series of lightning talks. Exploring ideas of iconoclasm, ‘warchitecture’, memory, violence and renewal, papers will consider architectural destruction from the sixteenth century to the present. Part of the Architecture Cluster’s Series of events.

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16:00
Reading Material Reading Life: Bene Israel, Colonial Modernity and Jewish Marathi- English Print Culture in Bombay (1859-1930)

SOAS:Paul Webley Wing (Senate House) Room: Wolfson Lecture Theatre

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Abstract In the mid- 18th century, a little-known community of Marathi-speaking Jews of India ,the Bene-Israel,  who had lived in isolation in Konkan region of Maharashtra for centuries, moved to Bombay for employment and educational opportunities offered by the British rule. Bombay had, by then, developed into a colonial metropolis with a bustling port city witnessing an unfolding of colonial modernity. They took up minor jobs as masons, carpenters, electricians and worked at shipyards leaving behind their traditional trade of oil-pressing. They also enlisted themselves into military services  as “Native Jew Caste” as evident in some 18th century writings by European observers. In 1796, the  first Bene Israel synagogue was built by Samaji Hassaji(or Samuel)Divekar (d.1797), a subedar in a British native regiment and benefactor of the community in Bombay.

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16:00
What should I wear with my tape-recorder? Aurality, mobility and sound technology in postwar Japan

SOAS:Russell Square: College Buildings Room: Djam Lecture Theatre (DLT)

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Abstract This talk provides an introduction to the hobby of sound hunting (Namaroku) in Japan. The boom in popularity of sound recording as a hobby began in the late 1960s and faded out by the early 1980s. Yet, drawing on efforts since the 1950s to create documentary sound and produce sound effects, as well as a growing fascination for recording the sounds of nature, everyday life and modern technology, the ‘Namaroku boom’ took the amateur enthusiast beyond the domestic realm where the capturing of music and conversation had been the focus of sound recording culture up to the late 1960s. In magazines, handbooks, and manufacturers’ advertising campaigns young Japanese were urged to go out and about with a tape recorder to find, research and create ‘real sound’. This was part of a broader global transformation that saw the consumption and control of sound through technological mediation gradually taken out of the hands of experts. The promotion of ‘sound hunting’ tied the consumption of sound to consumer society and created a mediascape that emphasised individualism, mobility and experimentation in relation to the everyday soundscape. This paper explores the wider social and cultural contexts within which sound and sound recording technology resonated in postwar Japan and offers an important case study for the role of technology and consumerism in sound studies.

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16:00
Reconstructing the Poet’s Image through Institutional Translation —a Case Study of Rewi Alley’s Translation of Li Bai’s Poems

SOAS:Brunei Gallery Room: B103

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Speaker: Professor Huijuan Ma (Beijing Foreign Studies University) Abstract

16:00
Innovation Bureaucracies: How agile stability creates the entrepreneurial state

SOAS:Paul Webley Wing (Senate House) Room: SALT

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The talk will focus on how to (re-)define what entrepreneurial states are: namely, these are states that are capable of unleashing innovations and wealth resulting from those, and of maintaining socio-political stability at the same time. Innovation bureaucracies are constellations of public organisations that deliver such agile stability. Such balancing act makes public bureaucracies unique in how they work, succeed and fail. The talk looks at the historical evolution of innovation bureaucracy by focusing on public organisations dealing with knowledge and technology, economic development and growth; and briefly show how agility and stability are delivered through starkly different bureaucratic organisations. Hence, what matters for capacity and capabilities are not single organisations but organisational configurations and how they evolve.

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16:00
Letters from across the Arabian Sea : Imdadullah Makki and the North Indian ulama in the 19th century

SOAS:Russell Square: College Buildings Room: G3

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Organiser: Dr Roy Fischel Contact email: rf26@soas.ac.uk

16:00
Gender and Media

SOAS:Faber Building, 23/24 Russell Square Room: FG01

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The Iraqi media landscape is defined by concerns that have afflicted the country over the last century, namely conflict, violence, geopolitics and corruption. The mainstream media landscape now reflects political narratives of the state and political actors, providing a tool for control and violence. Newsroom hierarchies and organisational structures reflect this politicised landscape; issues related to gender equality and women’s rights remain contested. This politicisation coupled with the rising influence of non-state actors on the political scene, such as ISIS or paramilitary groups across Iraq, sees threats to journalists on the increase. Online harassment of female journalists is reported with alarming regularity. Cases where journalists have been discriminated against and excluded on a gender basis are many. This lecture will provide insight into the structural conditions that are impacting on the development of content for and by women. Based on interviews with media practitioners and focus groups with audiences across Iraq, May – October 2019, it will examine the extent to which Iraqi women are playing a role in the creation and dissemination of media content and identify the main obstacles to equal access and participation of women in the media.

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16:00
Intellectual Property and Gender

Kings College:Somerset House East Wing, Strand Campus

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Over the past several decades, gender studies have attracted the attention of scholars in numerous areas of law, mainly in criminal law, family law, human rights, employment law, tax, and business law. However, only recently have legal scholars started to look at gender issues in intellectual property laws. For instance, copyright historically focused on the ‘fine arts’, including sculpture, music, painting and literature, areas that were dominated by men, while ‘domestic crafts’ such as needlework, traditional fiber arts and knitting, associated with women and home handicraft, fell outside of copyrightable subject matter in the past. Although the social views on gender and IP laws have changed a lot, empirical research demonstrated that latent gender bias, especially in patenting, still remains. In this session, we will investigate whether intellectual property has a gender, how gender insights from non-IP doctrine can be applied to bridge the gender gap in IP, and measures on ensuring equitable systems of encouraging innovation and creativity. Reading: Dan L Burk, ‘Bridging the Gender Gap in Intellectual Property’ (2018) WIPO MagazineInmaculada de Melo-Martín, ‘Patenting and the Gender Gap: Should Women Be Encouraged to Patent More?’ (2013) 19 Science and Engineering Ethics 491. Available atAnn Bartow, ‘Fair Use and the Fairer Sex: Gender, Feminism, and Copyright Law’ (2006) 14 American University Journal of Gender, Social Policy & the Law 551Additional Reading: Katharine T Bartlett, Deborah L Rhode and Joanna L Grossman, Gender and Law: Theory, Doctrine, Commentary (7th edn, Aspen Casebook 2016) M R Kirkwood, ‘Equality of Property Interests Between Husband and Wife’ (1923-1924) 8 Minn L Rev 579Wendy Syfret, ‘how women are changing the world with textiles’ i-D Vice (14 November 2016)Kevin J Greene, ‘Intellectual Property at the Intersection of Race and Gender: Lady Sings the Blues’ (2008) 16 American University Journal of Gender, Social Policy & the Law 365. Available at

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16:00
Risk and Education

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Risk is central to some education research, namely research looking at the construction of children and young people as vulnerable or ‘at-risk’ and research documenting the impact of students’ engagement in forms of adventure learning, sometimes called ‘risky play’. But the literature is conceptually limited. In this presentation I adopt a governmentality perspective to develop a theoretical strategy to understanding schools as risk institutions and the importance of risk to consolidating market discipline and monopoly governance as techniques for restoring public trust.

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16:00
Goldsmiths Writers' Centre presents Three Poets

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Three poets Mimi Khalvati, Peter Daniels and Cathy Galvin

16:15
Tracing Patterns of Textiles in Ancient Java (8th-15th century)

SOAS:Russell Square: College Buildings Room: 4426

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Abstract The lecture provides an overview of the repertoire of textile-related patterns found on Ancient Javanese art and architecture, dated from 8th-15th century. The patterns, impressed upon stone and metal surfaces, enrich temple walls and the attire of Hindu-Buddhist deities and royalty. The lack of surviving textile material from this early period makes these patterns useful for tracing different types of textiles that may have existed in Ancient Java. Upon close scrutiny, however, the pattern’s veracity as a literal representation of an actual fabric can be called into question. Rather, the textile designs can be seen as a sculptor’s response to international styles. One example is a particular pattern found on a group of panels on the exterior walls of Candi Sewu, an eighth-century Buddhist temple in Central Java, which will be examined in detail.

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16:15
Urban geopolitics and the figure of the immigrant in Europe

SOAS:Russell Square: College Buildings Room: Khalili Lecture Theatre (KLT)

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Further details to follow. The events are free and open to the public. Registration is not required.

16:30
Cosimo I de’Medici and Granducal Florence

School of Advanced Study:Warburg Institute, Woburn Square, London WC1H 0AB

event:book

Jonathan Davies (University of Warwick): '"He was supremely an imitator of [them]": Cosimo I, Cosimo the Elder, and Lorenzo the Magnificent' Contemporaries noted the fascination of Cosimo I with his ancestors Cosimo the Elder and Lorenzo the Magnificent.  This paper will examine that attraction and discuss possible influences of his fifteenth-century ancestors on the first grand duke of Tuscany. Gemma Cornetti (Warburg Institute): 'Engraved Portraits for the Medici'  Throughout his lifetime, Duke Cosimo I de’ Medici gave attention, unprecedented in the history of the Medici family, to the commissioning of portraits of himself and his ancestors in various artistic media. In contrast to painted and sculpted portraits, portrait prints bearing his likeness, and issued when he was alive, did not stem from his direct commission - Cosimo was largely a recipient of them. In this paper, by focusing on these portrait prints, I aim to challenge modern concepts applied to portraiture such as ‘self-fashioning’, ‘self-projection’ or ‘propaganda’, and stress the greater role of printmakers and courtiers in the construction and dissemination of Cosimo’s likeness. Cosimo I de’ Medici (1519-1574), first Grandduke of Tuscany, was both a consummate administrator and a fierce patron of the arts. The lecture series Cosimo I De’Medici and Granducal Florence celebrates the 500th anniversary of Cosimo I de’ Medici’s birth by bringing together scholars from across the humanities to discuss Cosimo’s achievements in art, architecture, statecraft, scholarship and culture. Pairs of scholars will offer specialist discussions over the course of six evenings, from June 2019 to January 2020. Evenings will be devoted to issues of diplomacy and spying, architectural and artistic commissions, the development of universities and libraries, as well as Cosimo’s personal learning and self-representation.   FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC, AND FOLLOWED BY A WINE RECEPTION.

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16:30
Contemporary Art Talk: Marianna Simnett

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Marianna Simnett makes makes films, installations, drawings and sculptures about bodies and their potential for transformation. Simnett’s bodies are mutants and hybrids, playing dangerous games to deadly limits. They faint, they undergo medical procedures, they die and they come back to life. Unflinching and raw, Simnett uncovers the parts of ourselves that usually remain concealed.

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17:00
Brazil in translation

Kings College:King's Building, Strand Campus

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Join the Brazil Institute for an evening of lusophone prose, poetry and drama. Through a series of reading and discussions, we'll be exploring the beauty, wonder and challenges of translating from the Portuguese. Speakers include: Margaret Jull Costa (renowned translator) Almiro Andrade (director and translator)   About the speakers Margaret Jull Costa, OBE, is a multi-award-winning translator. She has worked on writers, such as Jose Saramago, Eça de Queiroz, Fernando Pessoa, Paulo Coelho and Michel Laub. Almiro Andrade, PhD, is a director, academic and translator. His work encompasses English adaptations of Namibia Não! (by Aldri Anunciação), and The Blind One and The Mad One (by Claudia Barral).

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17:00
Book Launch event for Paolo Savoia with Renaissance Skin

Kings College:Anatomy Museum

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Book Launch: ‘Gaspare Tagliacozzi and Early Modern Surgery: Faces, Men, and Pain’, by Paolo Savoia Join us for the launch event of the English edition of Paolo Savoia’s new book. Paolo will be joined by Evelyn Welch and Elaine Leong (UCL) to introduce his publication, which examines the work of Bolognese physician and anatomist Gaspare Tagliacozzi to explore the social and cultural history of early modern surgery. Gaspare Tagliacozzi and Early Modern Surgery: Faces, Men, and Pain discusses how Italian and European surgeons' attitudes to health and beauty – and how patients' gender – shaped views on the public appearance of the human body. The event will be accompanied by a drinks reception. Please meet at the Strand Campus reception at 17:50 to be taken up to the Anatomy Museum, if external to King's.

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17:30
How To Save Our Democracies? (A Rethinking the Public event, featuring Rick Edwards, Peter MacLeod, and Neal Lawson)

Queen Mary:People's Palace - Skeel Lecture Theatre

event:book

17:30
Taking the Country's Side: Architecture and Agriculture

Architectural Association: 33 First Floor Back

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Given the environmental predicament which is now ours, our core hypothesis is that no sound reasoning will develop on the future of agriculture and architecture, which both emerged as the twin fairies of the Neolithic revolution (and thereafter of the Anthropocene), unless those two fields of concerns are reconnected and fundamentally rethought in conjunction to one another. Our intention is thus to deeply question the growing divorce and estrangement of the two disciplines, as it was initiated by the scientific revolution (and its so-called mastery and domination of nature), pronounced by the spread of market economy, and consecrated by the industrial era, which precipitated both into the parallel dead-ends of metropolitan congestion and monocultural deserts. Taking the Country’s Side extends to architects, as well as to all those concerned by the current evolution of our living environments, an invitation to leave their metropolitan niche, their zones of professional comfort and smartness, and literally “take a walk on the wild side”. For now several decades, it so happens that several individuals and communities, committed to enacting alternatives to the deleterious processes of industrial agriculture and market economy (under the name of permaculture, social ecology, agroforestry, bioregionalism or agroecology), have evolved a treasure trove of ideas and principles that significantly challenge the core concepts of architecture and urbanism today. As a poetics of reason for the Anthropocene, this practical wisdom is in our view more relevant than what Academia usually has to offer, and way more pointed than what currently circulates under the name of “architectural theory“.

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17:30
Writers: Paving the Way to an Inclusive Future – Panel Discussion

University of the Arts London:London College of Communication

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18:30
The Future of Television: Creating an Inclusive World – Panel Discussion

University of the Arts London:London College of Communication

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30

Thursday

11:00

FANS Science Meeting - January 2020

Kings College: Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), Denmark Hill Campus

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MEETING FOCUS Talk 1: Sensory abnormalities are common in neurodevelopmental disorders, including ASD and ADHD. However, sensory processing abnormalities are often studied subjectively and the underlying neurophysiological principles, as well as the impact of clinical manifestations of these disorders, remain unclear. Tactile processing is closely linked to the inhibitory system, and the inhibitory system has been shown to be impacted in both ASD and ADHD. In this talk, Nick will present his work quantifying tactile abnormalities in ASD and ADHD, linking these to inhibitory measures (with 1H-MRS) showing that abnormal brain GABA potentially drives altered tactile function, and that disorder-specific tactile abnormalities are closely related to disorder-specific clinical symptoms.   Bio: A Senior Lecturer at the FANS department (IoPPN), Nick’s primary work focuses on using multimodal approaches (psychophysics, MRI/MRS, and TMS) to study the neurophysiology of normal and abnormal tactile function, with a focus on studying how abnormal sensory processing is related to GABAergic dysfunction in children with neurodevelopmental disorders.   Talk 2: What’s the best way to get your work accepted in selective journals? In this talk, former FANS postdoc turned editor Dr Jamie Horder will discuss the different types of journals out there, what editors look for when deciding what to send out to review, and how to improve your chances of success in publishing your work. He will also be happy to answer questions from anyone interested in editorial careers. Bio: After his PhD in Oxford, Jamie did his postdoc research at the FANS department, with a focus on investigating brain GABA and glutamate in autism using MRI, EEG and PET. Since 2017 he has been employed by SpringerNature as an associate editor at Nature Communications and had recently moved to Nature Human Behaviour.   For more information please contact: marija-magdalena.petrinovic@kcl.ac.uk To RSVP email: fansevents@kcl.ac.uk Refreshments will be provided

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11:00
FANS Science Meeting - January 2020

Kings College:Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), Denmark Hill Campus

event

MEETING FOCUS Talk 1: Sensory abnormalities are common in neurodevelopmental disorders, including ASD and ADHD. However, sensory processing abnormalities are often studied subjectively and the underlying neurophysiological principles, as well as the impact of clinical manifestations of these disorders, remain unclear. Tactile processing is closely linked to the inhibitory system, and the inhibitory system has been shown to be impacted in both ASD and ADHD. In this talk, Nick will present his work quantifying tactile abnormalities in ASD and ADHD, linking these to inhibitory measures (with 1H-MRS) showing that abnormal brain GABA potentially drives altered tactile function, and that disorder-specific tactile abnormalities are closely related to disorder-specific clinical symptoms.   Bio: A Senior Lecturer at the FANS department (IoPPN), Nick’s primary work focuses on using multimodal approaches (psychophysics, MRI/MRS, and TMS) to study the neurophysiology of normal and abnormal tactile function, with a focus on studying how abnormal sensory processing is related to GABAergic dysfunction in children with neurodevelopmental disorders.   Talk 2: What’s the best way to get your work accepted in selective journals? In this talk, former FANS postdoc turned editor Dr Jamie Horder will discuss the different types of journals out there, what editors look for when deciding what to send out to review, and how to improve your chances of success in publishing your work. He will also be happy to answer questions from anyone interested in editorial careers. Bio: After his PhD in Oxford, Jamie did his postdoc research at the FANS department, with a focus on investigating brain GABA and glutamate in autism using MRI, EEG and PET. Since 2017 he has been employed by SpringerNature as an associate editor at Nature Communications and had recently moved to Nature Human Behaviour.   For more information please contact: marija-magdalena.petrinovic@kcl.ac.uk To RSVP email: fansevents@kcl.ac.uk Refreshments will be provided

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