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in London that are free and open to the public.

20

Thursday

12:00

RIOT Science Club – Unconscious Mind

Kings College: Social Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Centre, Denmark Hill Campus

event

RIOT Science Club Lecture: Unconscious Mind Speaker: Professor David Shanks A seminar series to raise awareness and provide training in Reproducible, Interpretable, Open, & Transparent Science. Putting the R.I.O.T into science! Reproducible Interpretable Open Transparent Weekly talks, workshops and tutorials on open science and more! Whether you are based at King's or not, the RIOT Science is open to all. Email contact: riotscienceclub@kcl.ac.uk YouTube Twitter @riotscienceclub

+

13:00

How Extremism Spreads

RSA: DSA, The RSA, 8 John Adam St, London, WC2N 6EZ

event

How Extremism Spreads Thursday 20th February 2020 1.00pm - 2.00pm 8 John Adam Street, London, WC2N 6EZ Groups embracing fanatical ideologies are on the rise worldwide. How can understanding their social and online behaviour help to counter them? Extremist groups are by no means a new phenomenon, but the internet has radically changed the way these groups operate, turbo-charging their ability to target and recruit susceptible people and advance dangerous agendas. What brings people to these networks, and what keeps them there? How do they mobilise their members to spread hate and disinformation, plot intimidation campaigns, and coordinate terrorist activity? Counter-extremism expert Julia Ebner shares the findings from her time spent undercover in these dark corners of the internet, observing how the cultures of extremist groups operate and how they are evolving. Technologically smart, emotionally manipulative, and socially powerful, these networks threaten to shift our politics and our societies in a dangerous direction – but understanding how they play on our weaknesses and exploit the tools at their disposal, Ebner tells us, is key to protecting ourselves and each other against the harms of extremist ideology. #RSAextremism

+

13:00

Chronic urban particulate matter exposure aggravates myocardial infarction by sequential impairment of lung redox metabolism, inflammation, and cardiac mitochondrial function

Kings College: Franklin-Wilkins Building, Waterloo Campus

event

Speaker: Professor Timoteo Marchini, School of Pharmacy and Biochemistry, University of Buenos Aries, Argentina Description: The environmental particulate matter exposure is associated with cardiovascular disease onset and progression, leading to increased morbidity and mortality rates mainly from myocardial infarction. Herein, we will provide mechanistic insights on this observation, with a special focus on lung impaired redox metabolism, local and systemic inflammation, and cardiac mitochondrial function.

+

14:00

History and Treasures of Guildhall Library

Guildhall Library: Guildhall Library, Aldermanbury, London, EC2V 7HH

event

Join our librarians to learn about the history of Guildhall Library and tour the building.

17:00

Maps and Society: 'When maps go to war'

School of Advanced Study: Warburg Institute, Woburn Square, London WC1H 0AB

event:book

Philip Curtis (Director, The Map House, London): ‘When maps go to war: pictorial conflict maps, 1900-1950’ Lectures in the history of cartography convened by Catherine Delano-Smith (Institute of Historical Research, University of London), Tony Campbell (formerly Map Library, British Library), Peter Barber (Visiting Fellow, History, King’s College, formerly Map Library, British Library) and Alessandro Scafi (Warburg Institute).  Meetings are usually held at the Warburg Institute, School of Advanced Study, University of London, Woburn Square, London WC1H OAB, at 5.00 pm on selected Thursdays. Admission is free (please reserve below), and each meeting is followed by refreshments. All are most welcome.  This programme has been made possible through the generous sponsorship of The Antiquarian Booksellers' Association, Educational Trust and The International Map Collectors' Society. Enquiries: Tony Campbell tony@tonycampbell.info. For the series archives and more information on the history of cartography see: https://www.maphistory.info/index.html

+

17:15

Masters of the Countryside and Their Enemies: Class Relations and Agrarian Changes in Rural Java, Indonesia

SOAS: Russell Square: College Buildings Room: G51a

event

Postponed because of strike. Part of the Agrarian Change Seminars. Further details to follow shortly.

17:30

Legacies of Colonialism in the Modern World series

School of Advanced Study: Woburn Suite, G22/26, Ground Floor, Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU

event:book

‘Brexit, education and Empire’ Professor Sally Tomlinson (Goldsmiths College) author of Education and Race from Empire to Brexit (2019) and (with Danny Dorling) Rule Britannia: Brexit and the end of Empire (2019). LCMW series.pdf

18:00

The Cato Street Conspiracy, 1820: A Study in Terrorism

Gresham College: Museum of London

event

Two hundred years ago a group of conspirators assembled in a Cato Street stable in order to plan the massacre of the whole British cabinet at dinner and bring about revolution. Had they succeeded they would have achieved modern Britain's first terrorist atrocity. They were, however, moved by hunger and by democratic and secular principles, so are comparisons with today's terrorists appropriate? The lecture discusses their identities, motives and impact, and the forgotten fact that their failure ended British revolutionary fantasies for a century.No reservations are required for this lecture. It will be run on a ‘first come, first served’ basis. Doors will open 30 minutes before the start of the lecture

+

18:00

The Politics and Ethics of Emerging Medical Collections from the Great War

Birkbeck: Birkbeck 43 Gordon Square, 106

event

This paper explores the archival afterlives of photographs of the facially injured and disfigured ex-servicemen of the Great War, focusing on the prolific records of reconstructive surgery and aftercare in military hospitals. From the scientific quest to record and understand these wounds and their treatment, to soldiers’ post-war reintegration, the photographs have struggled to shed the conditions of their making as specimen and records of surgical technique. In the late 1980s and early 1990s, partly to safeguard them in the public’s interest, such collections were transferred from Army museums to better-resourced institutions. Their move away from closed holdings within a military-medical context, made them more widely accessible. This talk explores how these photographs have been repurposed in archival space, where they seldom serve as mere surgical documents. Over time, these remediated images have been reclaimed by descendants of patients into a kind of ‘redemptive power of domestic love’, in an effort to welcome loved ones back in a relationship with kin or friends and away from their dehumanised portrayal in clinical settings. Retooling surgical photographs of disfigured soldiers as ancestors, these remediations embrace an expanded range of collections whose family practices and archives will always confound the reduction of that person to only a medical subject, an institutional object. Contact name: Patrizia Di Bello

+

18:00

The Meghan Effect: Royalty, Representation and the Resurgence of Institutionalised Racism in Britain - A Decolonial Dialogue

Birkbeck: Birkbeck Main Building, B36

event

Birkbeck Geography in collaboration with the Transatlantic Roundtable on Religion and Race and Decolonising the Curriculum at Birkbeck invite you to a panel discussion on institutionalised racism in Britain in the wake of Meghan Markle’s recent exit from these shores.  Join us as four Black academics at the cutting edge of analysis on issues of race, gender, religion, culture and education, look beyond the superficial media debates to engage in a dialogue about the structural nature of racialised inequality in Britain and what the ‘Meghan effect’ tells us about its resurgence in 21st Century Britain.  For tickets please visit the eventbrite page to book yourself a ticket here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/megxit-and-racism-in-britain-tickets-92341861995 Panellists Chair Lurraine Jones  Senior Lecturer and Acting Head of Department for Social Sciences and Social Work at UEL- specialist in issues of race within diversity training, Black British Identities and intersectionality. Dr William Ackah Lecturer in Community and Voluntary Sector Studies, Birkbeck, University of London- specialist in issues of African diaspora religion and politics, race and urban policy.  Professor Anthony Reddie recently appointed Director of the Oxford Centre for Religion and Culture. Dr Gabriella Beckles-Raymond Senior Lecturer, Womanist Philosopher- specialist in issues of critical race theory, intersectionality and ethics Rachel C. Boyle – Senior Lecturer in Children, Education and Communities Edge Hill University – specialist in issues of race, racism and ethnicity in education Contact name: Connor Hulme

+

18:00

"Making Healthy Happen For NFL Fans Across The UK" – Anatomy of a Marketing Campaign Collaboration

Birkbeck: Birkbeck Main Building, B35

event

Book your place now Join Jasdeep Thandi, Anytime Fitness, and Nick Sacks, NFL UK, discuss their collaboration on the marketing campaign, “Making Healthy Happen.   Please note this event is for Birkbeck students only.   Contact name: Sean Hamil

18:30

Dramaturgy as an act of civil disobedience: a panel discussion with Myah Jeffers, Anthony Simpson-Pike, and Anna Himali Howard

Birkbeck: Birkbeck 43 Gordon Square, G10

event

Book your place now "I remember once hearing a young male student describe the structure of his play.  He said, "Well, first it starts out, then it speeds up, and it's going and it's going, and then bam, it's over."  And I thought, ‘Do we think the arc is a natural structure because of the structure of the male orgasm?" From Sarah Ruhl’s ‘100 Essays I Don’t Have Time to Write’   How might the queering of dramaturgical practice serve to challenge common cultural assumptions about how we tell our stories? Who in our contemporary context has the opportunity to share their stories onstage and why? To what extent can dramaturgy as a discipline help us confront outdated concepts about the role theatre and performance play in our perceptions of ourselves? These are among the questions at the centre of our upcoming panel discussion ‘Dramaturgy as an act of civil disobedience’, hosted by Birkbeck’s Centre for Contemporary Theatre (BCCT). Dramaturgy in the twenty-first century is a discipline that can take a myriad of forms. From script consultancy to audience engagement, dramaturgs help grow and support the work of contemporary theatre-makers from conception to production. In celebration of Birkbeck's new MA Dramaturgy now recruiting for October 2020, this event investigates the disruptive potential of dramaturgical practice in contemporary culture. It features presentations from three of London’s leading dramaturgs and theatre-makers followed by a Q&A moderated by Dr Molly Flynn, programme director of Birkbeck's new MA Dramaturgy. Together, the presentations and discussion will consider pathways between theory, practice, and civic engagement in contemporary UK theatre and explore the role of the dramaturg in the twenty-first-century theatre. The event seeks to reflect the ethos of Birkbeck’s new MA Dramaturgy programme as a space for the exploration of alternative approaches to performance analysis, in particular, those focused on process, polyphony, and political engagement, rather than heteronormative notions of narrative structure as so eloquently depicted in the epigraph above. The event also provides the perfect opportunity to find out more about the structure of the new MA Dramaturgy at Birkbeck, and offers those interested in entering the field of theatre-making the chance to speak to academic staff and find out more about the course. Attendance is free but booking is essential.   Contact name: Molly Flynn Further details: More information about this event …

+

18:30

Culture in Climate Change: How should Museums act in the Environmental Emergency?

Architectural Association: AA Lecture Hall

event

The environmental emergency demands a total transformation of our culture. Museums and galleries are critical in instigating this new cultural discourse that responds to climate change, environmental emergency, and species extinction.  How can the museum and art world evolve to cultivate these conversations and create long-term thinking about our future, catalysing us into collective action, guiding us towards a new cultural paradigm, and interrogating the ethical, social and political implications of the Anthropocene? Museums are amongst the most environmentally conditioned spaces that we design: climate controlled vitrines inside climate controlled gallery spaces inside climate controlled buildings. How can we rethink the museum so that it not only minimises its own environmental impact, but so that it also embeds ecological thinking deeply into its design, display and discourse? This is a roundtable event, with speakers from London’s most high profile cultural institutions, including The Serpentine Gallery and the V&A East. They will debate the role of museums and art spaces in the environmental crisis, and discuss strategies both from a practical perspective - what real changes are being made to the way institutions are being designed and operated– and from a discourse perspective – through curatorial programming, research and educational outreach. This event is organised by Experimental Unit 13, led by Jessica Reynolds and Lily Jencks. Catherine Ince is Chief Curator of the V&A East Project as part of the Victoria and Albert Museum, which comprises a new O’Donnell &Tuomey Architects-designed museum and a new Collection Research Centre by Diller, Scofidio + Renfro. V&A East will open in 2023 as part of East Bank, a major new cultural and education district planned for the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, London. She previously worked at the Barbican Art Gallery, where she curated 'The World of Charles and Ray Eames' (2015) and 'Bauhaus: Art As Life' (2012). She regularly contributes to books, journals and online media about twentieth century and contemporary visual and material culture, and has lectured widely in the United Kingdom and internationally. Lucia Pietroiusti is Curator of General Ecology at the Serpentine Galleries, London, as well as the curator of Sun & Sea (Marina), the Lithuanian Pavilion at the 58th International Art Exhibition – La Biennale di Venezia, awarded by the Golden Lion. At Serpentine, Pietroiusti founded and curates the long-term ‘General Ecology’ project for Serpentine (2018-ongoing) dedicated to the implementation of ecological principles throughout all of the Galleries’ exhibitions and programmes. Recent projects include The Shape of a Circle in the Mind of a Fish series (with Filipa Ramos) and Microhabitable (with Fernando García-Dory). Forthcoming publications include More-than-Human, co-edited with Andrés Jaque and Marina Otero Verzier. Camilla Tham is Anthropocene Engagement Manager at the Natural History Museum in London. Her role is to raise awareness of the current state of the planet through engagement with the Museum’s collections and scientific research, and galvanise audiences to play a role in positive change for the future. She is currently working to establish a global network of museums, science centres and like-minded organisations who are committed to engaging audiences with the Anthropocene, and addressing what this means for humanity in terms of understanding the past, present and future of our planet. She previously led the Science Communication team at the Museum, delivering programmes such as the Friday night‘Lates’ and various face-to-face and digital forms of public engagement. Nick Merriman has been CEO of the Horniman since May 2018. He has refocused the organisation to take advantage of its position as the only museum in London where nature and culture can be seen together. Before that he was Director of the Manchester Museum, where he focused its mission on promoting understanding between cultures and working towards a sustainable world, and oversaw the refurbishment of most of the Museum’s permanent galleries. Previously Nick was Director of Museums and Collections, and Reader in Museum Studies, at University College London for eight years. The Horniman recently launched a Climate and Ecology Manifesto, outlining their platform for action to mitigate against the climate emergency by putting the environment at the heart of their mission, programming and collections.  Jessica Reynolds is a unit master of Experimental 13 at the AA. She is a director at London-based vPPR Architects, which investigates the continual crossover between art and architecture in residential and cultural projects. She is a founder of the Architecture Exchange, a platform that fosters debate between architecture and philosophy. She studied at Cambridge University and Princeton University. Lily Jencks is a unit master of Experimental 13 at the AA. She is the founder of JencksSquared and LilyJencksStudio, which looks at how content-driven forms can create strong identities for meaningful public interaction through architecture, landscape and interior projects in the UK and abroad. She studied at Columbia University and holds a master’s degree in Architecture and Landscape Architecture from the University of Pennsylvania. Image: Reflections of the Natural History Museum, by Lily Jencks

+

18:30

Game Theory and Politics Professor Bernhard von Stengel

London School of Economics: , Sheikh Zayed Theatre, New Academic Building

event

Game theory is the 'science of interaction'. This talk will explain some insights of game theory and apply them to current politics.

19:00

After Coal: Indigenous mining and life outside neoliberal extractivism in India's northeastern borderlands.

SOAS: Brunei Gallery Room: B103

event

Abstract This paper concern the mining of coal in Meghalaya, a small hill state in the north-eastern region of India. The extractive industries are largely in the hands of the indigenous elite, who have been able to accumulate massive wealth and, along with it, secure political power in the state. Pollution of water bodies and health hazards and risks for the mining labourers have pushed the Supreme Court to intervene and put a moratorium on the extraction of coal. This intervention divides the indigenous community: criticized by some as a violation of indigenous sovereignty and welcomed by others who take it as an invitation to build a sustainable future outside neoliberal extractivism. Women have been in the forefront of the anti-mining campaign, and the paper begin by narrating a recent event where two leading female activists were brutally attacked and left to die in a forest. An additional provocation with the anti-mining activists is that some of them also been outspoken against the attempt by male leaders to amend the traditional matrilineal kinship system and prevent indigenous women from marrying outsiders. As I will argue, in the combined protests one can detect what Ghassan Hage calls “alter-politics”, the contours of something radically different in the making.  

+

12:00
RIOT Science Club – Unconscious Mind

Kings College:Social Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Centre, Denmark Hill Campus

event

RIOT Science Club Lecture: Unconscious Mind Speaker: Professor David Shanks A seminar series to raise awareness and provide training in Reproducible, Interpretable, Open, & Transparent Science. Putting the R.I.O.T into science! Reproducible Interpretable Open Transparent Weekly talks, workshops and tutorials on open science and more! Whether you are based at King's or not, the RIOT Science is open to all. Email contact: riotscienceclub@kcl.ac.uk YouTube Twitter @riotscienceclub

+

13:00
How Extremism Spreads

RSA:DSA, The RSA, 8 John Adam St, London, WC2N 6EZ

event

How Extremism Spreads Thursday 20th February 2020 1.00pm - 2.00pm 8 John Adam Street, London, WC2N 6EZ Groups embracing fanatical ideologies are on the rise worldwide. How can understanding their social and online behaviour help to counter them? Extremist groups are by no means a new phenomenon, but the internet has radically changed the way these groups operate, turbo-charging their ability to target and recruit susceptible people and advance dangerous agendas. What brings people to these networks, and what keeps them there? How do they mobilise their members to spread hate and disinformation, plot intimidation campaigns, and coordinate terrorist activity? Counter-extremism expert Julia Ebner shares the findings from her time spent undercover in these dark corners of the internet, observing how the cultures of extremist groups operate and how they are evolving. Technologically smart, emotionally manipulative, and socially powerful, these networks threaten to shift our politics and our societies in a dangerous direction – but understanding how they play on our weaknesses and exploit the tools at their disposal, Ebner tells us, is key to protecting ourselves and each other against the harms of extremist ideology. #RSAextremism

+

13:00
Chronic urban particulate matter exposure aggravates myocardial infarction by sequential impairment of lung redox metabolism, inflammation, and cardiac mitochondrial function

Kings College:Franklin-Wilkins Building, Waterloo Campus

event

Speaker: Professor Timoteo Marchini, School of Pharmacy and Biochemistry, University of Buenos Aries, Argentina Description: The environmental particulate matter exposure is associated with cardiovascular disease onset and progression, leading to increased morbidity and mortality rates mainly from myocardial infarction. Herein, we will provide mechanistic insights on this observation, with a special focus on lung impaired redox metabolism, local and systemic inflammation, and cardiac mitochondrial function.

+

14:00
History and Treasures of Guildhall Library

Guildhall Library:Guildhall Library, Aldermanbury, London, EC2V 7HH

event

Join our librarians to learn about the history of Guildhall Library and tour the building.

17:00
Maps and Society: 'When maps go to war'

School of Advanced Study:Warburg Institute, Woburn Square, London WC1H 0AB

event:book

Philip Curtis (Director, The Map House, London): ‘When maps go to war: pictorial conflict maps, 1900-1950’ Lectures in the history of cartography convened by Catherine Delano-Smith (Institute of Historical Research, University of London), Tony Campbell (formerly Map Library, British Library), Peter Barber (Visiting Fellow, History, King’s College, formerly Map Library, British Library) and Alessandro Scafi (Warburg Institute).  Meetings are usually held at the Warburg Institute, School of Advanced Study, University of London, Woburn Square, London WC1H OAB, at 5.00 pm on selected Thursdays. Admission is free (please reserve below), and each meeting is followed by refreshments. All are most welcome.  This programme has been made possible through the generous sponsorship of The Antiquarian Booksellers' Association, Educational Trust and The International Map Collectors' Society. Enquiries: Tony Campbell tony@tonycampbell.info. For the series archives and more information on the history of cartography see: https://www.maphistory.info/index.html

+

17:15
Masters of the Countryside and Their Enemies: Class Relations and Agrarian Changes in Rural Java, Indonesia

SOAS:Russell Square: College Buildings Room: G51a

event

Postponed because of strike. Part of the Agrarian Change Seminars. Further details to follow shortly.

17:30
Legacies of Colonialism in the Modern World series

School of Advanced Study:Woburn Suite, G22/26, Ground Floor, Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU

event:book

‘Brexit, education and Empire’ Professor Sally Tomlinson (Goldsmiths College) author of Education and Race from Empire to Brexit (2019) and (with Danny Dorling) Rule Britannia: Brexit and the end of Empire (2019). LCMW series.pdf

+

18:00
The Cato Street Conspiracy, 1820: A Study in Terrorism

Gresham College:Museum of London

event

Two hundred years ago a group of conspirators assembled in a Cato Street stable in order to plan the massacre of the whole British cabinet at dinner and bring about revolution. Had they succeeded they would have achieved modern Britain's first terrorist atrocity. They were, however, moved by hunger and by democratic and secular principles, so are comparisons with today's terrorists appropriate? The lecture discusses their identities, motives and impact, and the forgotten fact that their failure ended British revolutionary fantasies for a century.No reservations are required for this lecture. It will be run on a ‘first come, first served’ basis. Doors will open 30 minutes before the start of the lecture

+

18:00
The Politics and Ethics of Emerging Medical Collections from the Great War

Birkbeck:Birkbeck 43 Gordon Square, 106

event

This paper explores the archival afterlives of photographs of the facially injured and disfigured ex-servicemen of the Great War, focusing on the prolific records of reconstructive surgery and aftercare in military hospitals. From the scientific quest to record and understand these wounds and their treatment, to soldiers’ post-war reintegration, the photographs have struggled to shed the conditions of their making as specimen and records of surgical technique. In the late 1980s and early 1990s, partly to safeguard them in the public’s interest, such collections were transferred from Army museums to better-resourced institutions. Their move away from closed holdings within a military-medical context, made them more widely accessible. This talk explores how these photographs have been repurposed in archival space, where they seldom serve as mere surgical documents. Over time, these remediated images have been reclaimed by descendants of patients into a kind of ‘redemptive power of domestic love’, in an effort to welcome loved ones back in a relationship with kin or friends and away from their dehumanised portrayal in clinical settings. Retooling surgical photographs of disfigured soldiers as ancestors, these remediations embrace an expanded range of collections whose family practices and archives will always confound the reduction of that person to only a medical subject, an institutional object. Contact name: Patrizia Di Bello

+

18:00
The Meghan Effect: Royalty, Representation and the Resurgence of Institutionalised Racism in Britain - A Decolonial Dialogue

Birkbeck:Birkbeck Main Building, B36

event

Birkbeck Geography in collaboration with the Transatlantic Roundtable on Religion and Race and Decolonising the Curriculum at Birkbeck invite you to a panel discussion on institutionalised racism in Britain in the wake of Meghan Markle’s recent exit from these shores.  Join us as four Black academics at the cutting edge of analysis on issues of race, gender, religion, culture and education, look beyond the superficial media debates to engage in a dialogue about the structural nature of racialised inequality in Britain and what the ‘Meghan effect’ tells us about its resurgence in 21st Century Britain.  For tickets please visit the eventbrite page to book yourself a ticket here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/megxit-and-racism-in-britain-tickets-92341861995 Panellists Chair Lurraine Jones  Senior Lecturer and Acting Head of Department for Social Sciences and Social Work at UEL- specialist in issues of race within diversity training, Black British Identities and intersectionality. Dr William Ackah Lecturer in Community and Voluntary Sector Studies, Birkbeck, University of London- specialist in issues of African diaspora religion and politics, race and urban policy.  Professor Anthony Reddie recently appointed Director of the Oxford Centre for Religion and Culture. Dr Gabriella Beckles-Raymond Senior Lecturer, Womanist Philosopher- specialist in issues of critical race theory, intersectionality and ethics Rachel C. Boyle – Senior Lecturer in Children, Education and Communities Edge Hill University – specialist in issues of race, racism and ethnicity in education Contact name: Connor Hulme

+

18:00
"Making Healthy Happen For NFL Fans Across The UK" – Anatomy of a Marketing Campaign Collaboration

Birkbeck:Birkbeck Main Building, B35

event

Book your place now Join Jasdeep Thandi, Anytime Fitness, and Nick Sacks, NFL UK, discuss their collaboration on the marketing campaign, “Making Healthy Happen.   Please note this event is for Birkbeck students only.   Contact name: Sean Hamil

+

18:30
Dramaturgy as an act of civil disobedience: a panel discussion with Myah Jeffers, Anthony Simpson-Pike, and Anna Himali Howard

Birkbeck:Birkbeck 43 Gordon Square, G10

event

Book your place now "I remember once hearing a young male student describe the structure of his play.  He said, "Well, first it starts out, then it speeds up, and it's going and it's going, and then bam, it's over."  And I thought, ‘Do we think the arc is a natural structure because of the structure of the male orgasm?" From Sarah Ruhl’s ‘100 Essays I Don’t Have Time to Write’   How might the queering of dramaturgical practice serve to challenge common cultural assumptions about how we tell our stories? Who in our contemporary context has the opportunity to share their stories onstage and why? To what extent can dramaturgy as a discipline help us confront outdated concepts about the role theatre and performance play in our perceptions of ourselves? These are among the questions at the centre of our upcoming panel discussion ‘Dramaturgy as an act of civil disobedience’, hosted by Birkbeck’s Centre for Contemporary Theatre (BCCT). Dramaturgy in the twenty-first century is a discipline that can take a myriad of forms. From script consultancy to audience engagement, dramaturgs help grow and support the work of contemporary theatre-makers from conception to production. In celebration of Birkbeck's new MA Dramaturgy now recruiting for October 2020, this event investigates the disruptive potential of dramaturgical practice in contemporary culture. It features presentations from three of London’s leading dramaturgs and theatre-makers followed by a Q&A moderated by Dr Molly Flynn, programme director of Birkbeck's new MA Dramaturgy. Together, the presentations and discussion will consider pathways between theory, practice, and civic engagement in contemporary UK theatre and explore the role of the dramaturg in the twenty-first-century theatre. The event seeks to reflect the ethos of Birkbeck’s new MA Dramaturgy programme as a space for the exploration of alternative approaches to performance analysis, in particular, those focused on process, polyphony, and political engagement, rather than heteronormative notions of narrative structure as so eloquently depicted in the epigraph above. The event also provides the perfect opportunity to find out more about the structure of the new MA Dramaturgy at Birkbeck, and offers those interested in entering the field of theatre-making the chance to speak to academic staff and find out more about the course. Attendance is free but booking is essential.   Contact name: Molly Flynn Further details: More information about this event …

+

18:30
Culture in Climate Change: How should Museums act in the Environmental Emergency?

Architectural Association: AA Lecture Hall

event

The environmental emergency demands a total transformation of our culture. Museums and galleries are critical in instigating this new cultural discourse that responds to climate change, environmental emergency, and species extinction.  How can the museum and art world evolve to cultivate these conversations and create long-term thinking about our future, catalysing us into collective action, guiding us towards a new cultural paradigm, and interrogating the ethical, social and political implications of the Anthropocene? Museums are amongst the most environmentally conditioned spaces that we design: climate controlled vitrines inside climate controlled gallery spaces inside climate controlled buildings. How can we rethink the museum so that it not only minimises its own environmental impact, but so that it also embeds ecological thinking deeply into its design, display and discourse? This is a roundtable event, with speakers from London’s most high profile cultural institutions, including The Serpentine Gallery and the V&A East. They will debate the role of museums and art spaces in the environmental crisis, and discuss strategies both from a practical perspective - what real changes are being made to the way institutions are being designed and operated– and from a discourse perspective – through curatorial programming, research and educational outreach. This event is organised by Experimental Unit 13, led by Jessica Reynolds and Lily Jencks. Catherine Ince is Chief Curator of the V&A East Project as part of the Victoria and Albert Museum, which comprises a new O’Donnell &Tuomey Architects-designed museum and a new Collection Research Centre by Diller, Scofidio + Renfro. V&A East will open in 2023 as part of East Bank, a major new cultural and education district planned for the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, London. She previously worked at the Barbican Art Gallery, where she curated 'The World of Charles and Ray Eames' (2015) and 'Bauhaus: Art As Life' (2012). She regularly contributes to books, journals and online media about twentieth century and contemporary visual and material culture, and has lectured widely in the United Kingdom and internationally. Lucia Pietroiusti is Curator of General Ecology at the Serpentine Galleries, London, as well as the curator of Sun & Sea (Marina), the Lithuanian Pavilion at the 58th International Art Exhibition – La Biennale di Venezia, awarded by the Golden Lion. At Serpentine, Pietroiusti founded and curates the long-term ‘General Ecology’ project for Serpentine (2018-ongoing) dedicated to the implementation of ecological principles throughout all of the Galleries’ exhibitions and programmes. Recent projects include The Shape of a Circle in the Mind of a Fish series (with Filipa Ramos) and Microhabitable (with Fernando García-Dory). Forthcoming publications include More-than-Human, co-edited with Andrés Jaque and Marina Otero Verzier. Camilla Tham is Anthropocene Engagement Manager at the Natural History Museum in London. Her role is to raise awareness of the current state of the planet through engagement with the Museum’s collections and scientific research, and galvanise audiences to play a role in positive change for the future. She is currently working to establish a global network of museums, science centres and like-minded organisations who are committed to engaging audiences with the Anthropocene, and addressing what this means for humanity in terms of understanding the past, present and future of our planet. She previously led the Science Communication team at the Museum, delivering programmes such as the Friday night‘Lates’ and various face-to-face and digital forms of public engagement. Nick Merriman has been CEO of the Horniman since May 2018. He has refocused the organisation to take advantage of its position as the only museum in London where nature and culture can be seen together. Before that he was Director of the Manchester Museum, where he focused its mission on promoting understanding between cultures and working towards a sustainable world, and oversaw the refurbishment of most of the Museum’s permanent galleries. Previously Nick was Director of Museums and Collections, and Reader in Museum Studies, at University College London for eight years. The Horniman recently launched a Climate and Ecology Manifesto, outlining their platform for action to mitigate against the climate emergency by putting the environment at the heart of their mission, programming and collections.  Jessica Reynolds is a unit master of Experimental 13 at the AA. She is a director at London-based vPPR Architects, which investigates the continual crossover between art and architecture in residential and cultural projects. She is a founder of the Architecture Exchange, a platform that fosters debate between architecture and philosophy. She studied at Cambridge University and Princeton University. Lily Jencks is a unit master of Experimental 13 at the AA. She is the founder of JencksSquared and LilyJencksStudio, which looks at how content-driven forms can create strong identities for meaningful public interaction through architecture, landscape and interior projects in the UK and abroad. She studied at Columbia University and holds a master’s degree in Architecture and Landscape Architecture from the University of Pennsylvania. Image: Reflections of the Natural History Museum, by Lily Jencks

+

18:30
Game Theory and Politics Professor Bernhard von Stengel

London School of Economics:, Sheikh Zayed Theatre, New Academic Building

event

Game theory is the 'science of interaction'. This talk will explain some insights of game theory and apply them to current politics.

19:00
After Coal: Indigenous mining and life outside neoliberal extractivism in India's northeastern borderlands.

SOAS:Brunei Gallery Room: B103

event

Abstract This paper concern the mining of coal in Meghalaya, a small hill state in the north-eastern region of India. The extractive industries are largely in the hands of the indigenous elite, who have been able to accumulate massive wealth and, along with it, secure political power in the state. Pollution of water bodies and health hazards and risks for the mining labourers have pushed the Supreme Court to intervene and put a moratorium on the extraction of coal. This intervention divides the indigenous community: criticized by some as a violation of indigenous sovereignty and welcomed by others who take it as an invitation to build a sustainable future outside neoliberal extractivism. Women have been in the forefront of the anti-mining campaign, and the paper begin by narrating a recent event where two leading female activists were brutally attacked and left to die in a forest. An additional provocation with the anti-mining activists is that some of them also been outspoken against the attempt by male leaders to amend the traditional matrilineal kinship system and prevent indigenous women from marrying outsiders. As I will argue, in the combined protests one can detect what Ghassan Hage calls “alter-politics”, the contours of something radically different in the making.  

+

21

Friday

08:30

UCL-KCL Environmental Law Symposium 2020

Kings College: UCL Laws (Gideon Schreier LT)

event

About this event The Fifth UCL-KCL Environmental Law Symposium will be held at the UCL Faculty of Laws. 2020 marks a critical turning point for the management of climate change and the environment. Both international and domestic legal frameworks are facing increasing pressures to meet the challenges posed by biodiversity loss, flooding, drought, human displacement, rising sea levels, and increases in greenhouse gas emissions. Calls for structural shifts in social, economic and political models are louder than they have ever been. The diverse role of the law in meeting environmental challenges calls for a matched response in scholarship; one which reflects the multifaceted, interdisciplinary nature of a subject that is in constant evolution. The Symposium will enable us to share academic challenges within the field of environmental law, and to provide an opportunity for our growing community to collaborate and support one another’s work. It is a recognised platform for early career researchers in environmental law to share their ideas in an encouraging, subject-specific context with their peers. Professor Maria Lee (UCL) will provide the opening keynote, followed by four panels of diverse PhD researchers led by expert academic chairs. Topics will include marine law, international environmental law, human rights, energy governance, green finance and climate change litigation. The UCL-KCL Environmental Law Symposium will be held at the UCL Faculty of Laws on Friday 21st February 2020. It is co-hosted by University College London’s Centre for Law and Environment and the Transnational Law Institute at King’s College London, and generously supported by the London Arts and Humanities Research Partnership. Programme Programme to follow   This event is sponsored by the Transnational Law Institute at The Dickson Poon School of Law.

+

13:00

State of the Association

Architectural Association: AA Lecture Hall

event

AA Director, Eva Franch i Gilabert, will give the State of the Association presentation to the School Community. It will be relayed to the Barrel Vault, AA Restaurant and Hooke Park. Only open to the School Community

13:00

Using informed dimension reduction to characterise the genetic architecture of immune-mediated disease

Kings College: Guy’s Hospital, Guy’s Campus

event

Using informed dimension reduction to characterise the genetic architecture of immune-mediated disease Speaker: Olly Burren, Cambridge Institute for Therapeutic Immunology and Infectious Disease Host: Debbie Cunninghame Graham

13:15

The Closet Vegetarians: Sociality of Vegetarianism in a Chinese Society

SOAS: Russell Square: College Buildings Room: Khalili Lecture Theatre

event

Dr Loretta Lou (LSE) ‘The Closet Vegetarians: Sociality of Vegetarianism in a Chinese Society’

17:00

Recovering the Ethical: Practices, Politics, Tradition

SOAS: Paul Webley Wing (Senate House) Room: S312

event

Abstract In this paper I explore the relationship between religion and morality. Mindful that the idea of the shari‘a is essential to Muslim tradition, and that this tradition is a guiding factor in Muslim life, I begin with an overview of how the shari‘a has been thought about in innovative ways. A contemporary case study illustrates how interpreting the shari‘a through a juridical lens can often belie the Qur’anic mandate to respect human dignity. I argue that the shari‘a must be properly understood as an ethical paradigm, as it once was.

+

17:30

Biotechnology and the Posthuman

:

event

The first in a series of Artist Seminars in partnership between Goldsmiths, Department of Computing and Lumen Art Projects. This event will feature four Lumen Prize artists who will explore the idea of Posthumanism and biotechnologies as open-ended systems and how this has influenced their practices.

18:00

CATHOLIC NUNS AND SISTERS IN A SECULAR AGE – BOOK LAUNCH

Birkbeck: Birkbeck 30 Russell Square, 101

event

Book your place now Dr Carmen Mangion on her new book which investigates the experiences of nuns and sisters in Britain from 1945 to 1990. Followed by a drinks reception.  Catholic Nuns and Sisters in a Catholic Age: Britain 1945 - 90 (Manchester University Press, 2020) centres on events in the 1960s, particular the Second Vatican Council (1962-1965). It importantly considers pre and post Vatican II social, cultural and religious events as influencers in these changes.  Drawing on archival sources and interviews with eighty nuns and sisters, it interrogates ‘lived experience’ by examining the day to day lives of women religious and uses social and cultural history methodologies to frame Vatican II as a social movement of the sixties, but like other social movements with a significant pre-history and afterlife.  It interrogates a range of themes, including youth culture, participatory democracy, the ‘turn to self’, post-war modernity, the voluntary sector and the women’s movement.  This event is part of Birkbeck's Discover the Past series. To see the full list of events, visit the Discover the Past web page. The Department of History, Classics and Archaeology at Birkbeck has a distinguished tradition as an international centre of excellence. We are the only university department in London to include archaeologists, classicists and historians investigating every period from prehistory to the early twenty-first century. Join us to discover the past and engage with the present across continents and cultures. Photographs may be taken at this event for future use in printed and online publicity, and social media. Contact name: Department of History, Classics and Archaeology

+

18:00

No Friend But The Mountains (Behrouz Boochani) Book Launch

Birkbeck: Birkbeck Clore Management Centre, B01

event

Book your place now The School of Law is honoured to be hosting the first London launch of Behrouz Boochani’s multi-award winning book No Friend But The Mountains (Picador). No Friend But the Mountains gives an intimate and insightful account of everyday life in Australia’s notorious prison for refugees and asylum-seekers on Manus Island, Papua New Guinea, where Boochani was detained from 2013 until its closure in 2017. Without regular access to a computer in detention, Boochani wrote the book by sending WhatsApp messages to his translator. The book is a stunning act of survival and resistance. Join us for a panel discussion with Behrouz Boochani (via Skype), his translator Omid Tofighian, and Sarah Keenan, Nadine El-Enany, Monish Bhatia, and Stewart Motha (Birkbeck) as they discuss the book, its intellectual and political contribution and its pedagogical power. The event will be chaired by Daniel Trilling, author of Lights In The Distance: Exile and Refuge At The Borders of Europe, which was shortlisted for the 2019 Bread and Roses Award for Radical Publishing.   This event is open to the public and free to attend however booking is required via this page. We kindly request that if you are unable to attend that you cancel your booking in order to allow others to attend. Latecomers to the event are not guaranteed entry. Please be advised that photographs may be taken at the event. Please contact us if you have any access requirements. See here for further details of accessibility at Birkbeck venues. Food and drink may be served at this event. Please contact us if you have any allergies that we may need to consider. Contact name: School of Law

+

18:00

"I didn't want to be a mother": The enforced lives of women who don't follow society's norms - CANCELLED

School of Advanced Study: Room 246, Second Floor, Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU

event:book

“I didn’t want to be a mother”: The enforced lives of women who don’t follow society’s norms Dr Trifonia Melibea Obono, National University of Equatorial Guinea Regrettably this event has been cancelled - we hope to reschedule at a later date. In this talk, Trifonia Melibea Obono will discuss her feminist and LGBT activism, as well as her latest nonfiction book Yo no quería ser madre (I didn’t want to be a mother), in which thirty Equatoguinean women denounce the harsh realities of people who identify as LGBT in Equatorial Guinea. Her talk will touch on issues including institutional and domestic violence against, and the cultural invisibility of, lesbians in Equatoguinean society and Africa more widely, but will also explore strategies for overcoming these injustices. Trifonia Melibea Obono is a political scientist and author of four award-winning novels. She has been listed by leading Spanish newspaper El Pais as one of Africa’s top ten most influential women, and is considered amongst the most brave and avant-garde of modern African writers. "Mi madre antes de marcharse a casa dejándome encarcelada, ordenó que no me dieran de comer, de beber, de cagar. Yo estuve sola hasta que un guardia empezó a conquistarme desmintiendo las conclusiones de los compañeros. Explicaba que yo era muy guapa, educada, formal y femenina, que no podía ser lesbiana. Gracias a él comía, bebía agua y dormía en un colchón." (Entrevistada 1, Yo no quería ser madre) The event is in Spanish, followed by a Q&A with English translation. All welcome - attendance is free of charge, but as space is limited, please register in advance. This event is organised and supported by the Institute of Modern Languages Research, the Instituto Cervantes London, the Centre for Iberian and Latin American Visual Studies at Birkbeck, University of London, and the Centre for International Development at Northumbria University. It is part of the Open World Research Initiative (OWRI) Cross-Language Dynamics: Reshaping Community, Translingual Strand. University statement on Senate House protests

+

08:30
UCL-KCL Environmental Law Symposium 2020

Kings College:UCL Laws (Gideon Schreier LT)

event

About this event The Fifth UCL-KCL Environmental Law Symposium will be held at the UCL Faculty of Laws. 2020 marks a critical turning point for the management of climate change and the environment. Both international and domestic legal frameworks are facing increasing pressures to meet the challenges posed by biodiversity loss, flooding, drought, human displacement, rising sea levels, and increases in greenhouse gas emissions. Calls for structural shifts in social, economic and political models are louder than they have ever been. The diverse role of the law in meeting environmental challenges calls for a matched response in scholarship; one which reflects the multifaceted, interdisciplinary nature of a subject that is in constant evolution. The Symposium will enable us to share academic challenges within the field of environmental law, and to provide an opportunity for our growing community to collaborate and support one another’s work. It is a recognised platform for early career researchers in environmental law to share their ideas in an encouraging, subject-specific context with their peers. Professor Maria Lee (UCL) will provide the opening keynote, followed by four panels of diverse PhD researchers led by expert academic chairs. Topics will include marine law, international environmental law, human rights, energy governance, green finance and climate change litigation. The UCL-KCL Environmental Law Symposium will be held at the UCL Faculty of Laws on Friday 21st February 2020. It is co-hosted by University College London’s Centre for Law and Environment and the Transnational Law Institute at King’s College London, and generously supported by the London Arts and Humanities Research Partnership. Programme Programme to follow   This event is sponsored by the Transnational Law Institute at The Dickson Poon School of Law.

+

13:00
State of the Association

Architectural Association: AA Lecture Hall

event

AA Director, Eva Franch i Gilabert, will give the State of the Association presentation to the School Community. It will be relayed to the Barrel Vault, AA Restaurant and Hooke Park. Only open to the School Community

+

13:00
Using informed dimension reduction to characterise the genetic architecture of immune-mediated disease

Kings College:Guy’s Hospital, Guy’s Campus

event

Using informed dimension reduction to characterise the genetic architecture of immune-mediated disease Speaker: Olly Burren, Cambridge Institute for Therapeutic Immunology and Infectious Disease Host: Debbie Cunninghame Graham

+

13:15
The Closet Vegetarians: Sociality of Vegetarianism in a Chinese Society

SOAS:Russell Square: College Buildings Room: Khalili Lecture Theatre

event

Dr Loretta Lou (LSE) ‘The Closet Vegetarians: Sociality of Vegetarianism in a Chinese Society’

17:00
Recovering the Ethical: Practices, Politics, Tradition

SOAS:Paul Webley Wing (Senate House) Room: S312

event

Abstract In this paper I explore the relationship between religion and morality. Mindful that the idea of the shari‘a is essential to Muslim tradition, and that this tradition is a guiding factor in Muslim life, I begin with an overview of how the shari‘a has been thought about in innovative ways. A contemporary case study illustrates how interpreting the shari‘a through a juridical lens can often belie the Qur’anic mandate to respect human dignity. I argue that the shari‘a must be properly understood as an ethical paradigm, as it once was.

+

17:30
Biotechnology and the Posthuman

:

event

The first in a series of Artist Seminars in partnership between Goldsmiths, Department of Computing and Lumen Art Projects. This event will feature four Lumen Prize artists who will explore the idea of Posthumanism and biotechnologies as open-ended systems and how this has influenced their practices.

+

18:00
CATHOLIC NUNS AND SISTERS IN A SECULAR AGE – BOOK LAUNCH

Birkbeck:Birkbeck 30 Russell Square, 101

event

Book your place now Dr Carmen Mangion on her new book which investigates the experiences of nuns and sisters in Britain from 1945 to 1990. Followed by a drinks reception.  Catholic Nuns and Sisters in a Catholic Age: Britain 1945 - 90 (Manchester University Press, 2020) centres on events in the 1960s, particular the Second Vatican Council (1962-1965). It importantly considers pre and post Vatican II social, cultural and religious events as influencers in these changes.  Drawing on archival sources and interviews with eighty nuns and sisters, it interrogates ‘lived experience’ by examining the day to day lives of women religious and uses social and cultural history methodologies to frame Vatican II as a social movement of the sixties, but like other social movements with a significant pre-history and afterlife.  It interrogates a range of themes, including youth culture, participatory democracy, the ‘turn to self’, post-war modernity, the voluntary sector and the women’s movement.  This event is part of Birkbeck's Discover the Past series. To see the full list of events, visit the Discover the Past web page. The Department of History, Classics and Archaeology at Birkbeck has a distinguished tradition as an international centre of excellence. We are the only university department in London to include archaeologists, classicists and historians investigating every period from prehistory to the early twenty-first century. Join us to discover the past and engage with the present across continents and cultures. Photographs may be taken at this event for future use in printed and online publicity, and social media. Contact name: Department of History, Classics and Archaeology

+

18:00
No Friend But The Mountains (Behrouz Boochani) Book Launch

Birkbeck:Birkbeck Clore Management Centre, B01

event

Book your place now The School of Law is honoured to be hosting the first London launch of Behrouz Boochani’s multi-award winning book No Friend But The Mountains (Picador). No Friend But the Mountains gives an intimate and insightful account of everyday life in Australia’s notorious prison for refugees and asylum-seekers on Manus Island, Papua New Guinea, where Boochani was detained from 2013 until its closure in 2017. Without regular access to a computer in detention, Boochani wrote the book by sending WhatsApp messages to his translator. The book is a stunning act of survival and resistance. Join us for a panel discussion with Behrouz Boochani (via Skype), his translator Omid Tofighian, and Sarah Keenan, Nadine El-Enany, Monish Bhatia, and Stewart Motha (Birkbeck) as they discuss the book, its intellectual and political contribution and its pedagogical power. The event will be chaired by Daniel Trilling, author of Lights In The Distance: Exile and Refuge At The Borders of Europe, which was shortlisted for the 2019 Bread and Roses Award for Radical Publishing.   This event is open to the public and free to attend however booking is required via this page. We kindly request that if you are unable to attend that you cancel your booking in order to allow others to attend. Latecomers to the event are not guaranteed entry. Please be advised that photographs may be taken at the event. Please contact us if you have any access requirements. See here for further details of accessibility at Birkbeck venues. Food and drink may be served at this event. Please contact us if you have any allergies that we may need to consider. Contact name: School of Law

+

18:00
"I didn't want to be a mother": The enforced lives of women who don't follow society's norms - CANCELLED

School of Advanced Study:Room 246, Second Floor, Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU

event:book

“I didn’t want to be a mother”: The enforced lives of women who don’t follow society’s norms Dr Trifonia Melibea Obono, National University of Equatorial Guinea Regrettably this event has been cancelled - we hope to reschedule at a later date. In this talk, Trifonia Melibea Obono will discuss her feminist and LGBT activism, as well as her latest nonfiction book Yo no quería ser madre (I didn’t want to be a mother), in which thirty Equatoguinean women denounce the harsh realities of people who identify as LGBT in Equatorial Guinea. Her talk will touch on issues including institutional and domestic violence against, and the cultural invisibility of, lesbians in Equatoguinean society and Africa more widely, but will also explore strategies for overcoming these injustices. Trifonia Melibea Obono is a political scientist and author of four award-winning novels. She has been listed by leading Spanish newspaper El Pais as one of Africa’s top ten most influential women, and is considered amongst the most brave and avant-garde of modern African writers. "Mi madre antes de marcharse a casa dejándome encarcelada, ordenó que no me dieran de comer, de beber, de cagar. Yo estuve sola hasta que un guardia empezó a conquistarme desmintiendo las conclusiones de los compañeros. Explicaba que yo era muy guapa, educada, formal y femenina, que no podía ser lesbiana. Gracias a él comía, bebía agua y dormía en un colchón." (Entrevistada 1, Yo no quería ser madre) The event is in Spanish, followed by a Q&A with English translation. All welcome - attendance is free of charge, but as space is limited, please register in advance. This event is organised and supported by the Institute of Modern Languages Research, the Instituto Cervantes London, the Centre for Iberian and Latin American Visual Studies at Birkbeck, University of London, and the Centre for International Development at Northumbria University. It is part of the Open World Research Initiative (OWRI) Cross-Language Dynamics: Reshaping Community, Translingual Strand. University statement on Senate House protests

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24

Monday

13:00

WHY 'SHOAH'? A CONCEPTUAL HISTORY

Birkbeck: Birkbeck Main Building

event

Hizky Shoham (Bar Ilan) discusses how the Hebrew word Shoah became a widely-used term for the genocide of Europe’s Jews during the Second World War. Organised by the Pears Institute for the Study of Antisemitism in association with the Department of History, Classics and Archaeology, Birkbeck. To book, email pearsinstitute@bbk.ac.uk. The Department of History, Classics and Archaeology at Birkbeck has a distinguished tradition as an international centre of excellence. We are the only university department in London to include archaeologists, classicists and historians investigating every period from prehistory to the early twenty-first century. Join us to discover the past and engage with the present across continents and cultures. To see the full list of events in Birkbeck's Discover the Past series, visit the Discover the Past web page.  Photographs may be taken at this event for future use in printed and online publicity, and social media. Contact name: Pears Institute for the Study of Antisemitism

+

13:00

How to Live Better and Age Well

RSA: Great Room, The RSA, 8 John Adam St, London, WC2N 6EZ,

event

How to Live Better and Age Well Monday 24th February 2020 1.00pm- 2.00pm 8 John Adam Street, London, WC2N 6EZ What really happens to our brains as we grow older? And what can we learn from those who thrive as they age? In “The Changing Mind: A Neuroscientist's Guide to Ageing Well”, leading neuroscientist Daniel Levitin offers a radical exploration of the science of ageing. Drawing on the latest research from the fields of neuroscience and psychology, he highlights the many cognitive benefits of advancing years, and challenges common assumptions around memory loss and our focus on lifespan instead of ‘healthspan’. Join Daniel Levitin at the RSA as he shares his vision of a future in which a combination of medical developments and healthy lifestyle choices could reduce or even reverse some of the negative side-effects of the ageing process. And of a society that views older people as a valuable resource, rather than a burden. Speaker: Daniel Levitin, neuroscientist, cognitive psychologist, authorChair: Tammaryn Lashley, Director of Research, Queen Square Brain Bank, UCL

+

17:00

Ironies of Solidarity: Insurance and Financialization of Kinship in South Africa

SOAS: Russell Square: College Buildings Room: G3

event

An ethnographic study of how financial products and services affect inequalities and conflicts in South Africa. Set in one of the world’s most unequal and violent places, this ethnographic study reveals how insurance companies discovered a vast market of predominantly poor African clients. After apartheid ended in 1994, South Africa became a ‘testing ground’ for new insurance products, new marketing techniques and pioneering administrative models with a potentially global market.

+

17:00

[CANCELLED] Erotic Art and Feminism in the 1960s

The Courtauld Institute of Art: Lecture Theatre 1, first floor, The Courtauld Institute of Art, Vernon Square, Penton Rise, King’s Cross, London, WC1X 9EW

event

Due to UCU industrial action beginning Thursday 20th February and ending on Friday 13th March, our events programme is subject to change, including cancellation. This event is cancelled.   In 1960s New York, erotic art was a broad, popular category that included everything from Pop art to abstract sculpture. The elasticity of the term “erotic” created a space in which women, later associated with the feminist art movement of the 1970s, publicly confronted stereotypes of gender and expressed their ideas about sexuality. However, erotic art’s status as a “low” genre and its perceived political ambiguity in feminist art history has helped to erased its significance in American art of the 1960s. This talk brings to light the ways women’s sexual art fundamentally challenged not only to the rules of art but also to accepted social standards for women. Carolee Schneemann’s films and performances, Martha Edelheit’s nudes, Marjorie Strider’s Pop art constructions, Hannah Wilke’s sculptures, and Anita Steckel’s collages exemplify the ways sexual politics could be fused with artistic innovation, across diverse media, to retool the sexist conventions of figuration and upend the presumed objectivity of formalism. Rachel Middleman is Associate Professor of Art History at California State University, Chico, where she teaches courses in modern, contemporary, and American art history. She is the author of Radical Eroticism: Women, Art, and Sex in the 1960s (University of California Press, 2018), which was supported by a Smithsonian American Art Museum Postdoctoral Fellowship. Her current research and recent publications focus on topics of women artists, feminist art, and the politics of legacy. She serves as the executor of feminist artist Anita Steckel’s estate.

+

18:00

Difference Festival- Astrobiology: The Hunt for Alien Life

University of Westminster: University of Westminster - Regent Campus, UG04, 309 Regent St, London, W1B 2HW

event

Astrobiology: The Hunt for Alient Life

18:15

What to believe in a post-truth world

Royal Holloway: Founder's Building

event

These days we inhabit a ‘post-truth’ world where scientific evidence and accurate information must compete with populist appeals to emotion, ‘fake news’ and ‘alternative facts’. In this lecture Professor McKay will attempt to shed some light on the human propensity to adopt false beliefs. In some cases, false beliefs may be seductive because their content is compelling, perhaps because it appeals to deeply entrenched prejudices. Humans are more inclined to accommodate evidence if it fits our preconceptions and preferences. In other cases, we may be influenced by the status – or sheer number – of others who endorse the belief. In an era where dubious claims are routinely propagated by highly visible individuals, it is little wonder that misbeliefs about empirical reality persist in the face of contrary scientific evidence.

+

13:00
WHY 'SHOAH'? A CONCEPTUAL HISTORY

Birkbeck:Birkbeck Main Building

event

Hizky Shoham (Bar Ilan) discusses how the Hebrew word Shoah became a widely-used term for the genocide of Europe’s Jews during the Second World War. Organised by the Pears Institute for the Study of Antisemitism in association with the Department of History, Classics and Archaeology, Birkbeck. To book, email pearsinstitute@bbk.ac.uk. The Department of History, Classics and Archaeology at Birkbeck has a distinguished tradition as an international centre of excellence. We are the only university department in London to include archaeologists, classicists and historians investigating every period from prehistory to the early twenty-first century. Join us to discover the past and engage with the present across continents and cultures. To see the full list of events in Birkbeck's Discover the Past series, visit the Discover the Past web page.  Photographs may be taken at this event for future use in printed and online publicity, and social media. Contact name: Pears Institute for the Study of Antisemitism

+

13:00
How to Live Better and Age Well

RSA:Great Room, The RSA, 8 John Adam St, London, WC2N 6EZ,

event

How to Live Better and Age Well Monday 24th February 2020 1.00pm- 2.00pm 8 John Adam Street, London, WC2N 6EZ What really happens to our brains as we grow older? And what can we learn from those who thrive as they age? In “The Changing Mind: A Neuroscientist's Guide to Ageing Well”, leading neuroscientist Daniel Levitin offers a radical exploration of the science of ageing. Drawing on the latest research from the fields of neuroscience and psychology, he highlights the many cognitive benefits of advancing years, and challenges common assumptions around memory loss and our focus on lifespan instead of ‘healthspan’. Join Daniel Levitin at the RSA as he shares his vision of a future in which a combination of medical developments and healthy lifestyle choices could reduce or even reverse some of the negative side-effects of the ageing process. And of a society that views older people as a valuable resource, rather than a burden. Speaker: Daniel Levitin, neuroscientist, cognitive psychologist, authorChair: Tammaryn Lashley, Director of Research, Queen Square Brain Bank, UCL

+

17:00
Ironies of Solidarity: Insurance and Financialization of Kinship in South Africa

SOAS:Russell Square: College Buildings Room: G3

event

An ethnographic study of how financial products and services affect inequalities and conflicts in South Africa. Set in one of the world’s most unequal and violent places, this ethnographic study reveals how insurance companies discovered a vast market of predominantly poor African clients. After apartheid ended in 1994, South Africa became a ‘testing ground’ for new insurance products, new marketing techniques and pioneering administrative models with a potentially global market.

+

17:00
[CANCELLED] Erotic Art and Feminism in the 1960s

The Courtauld Institute of Art:Lecture Theatre 1, first floor, The Courtauld Institute of Art, Vernon Square, Penton Rise, King’s Cross, London, WC1X 9EW

event

Due to UCU industrial action beginning Thursday 20th February and ending on Friday 13th March, our events programme is subject to change, including cancellation. This event is cancelled.   In 1960s New York, erotic art was a broad, popular category that included everything from Pop art to abstract sculpture. The elasticity of the term “erotic” created a space in which women, later associated with the feminist art movement of the 1970s, publicly confronted stereotypes of gender and expressed their ideas about sexuality. However, erotic art’s status as a “low” genre and its perceived political ambiguity in feminist art history has helped to erased its significance in American art of the 1960s. This talk brings to light the ways women’s sexual art fundamentally challenged not only to the rules of art but also to accepted social standards for women. Carolee Schneemann’s films and performances, Martha Edelheit’s nudes, Marjorie Strider’s Pop art constructions, Hannah Wilke’s sculptures, and Anita Steckel’s collages exemplify the ways sexual politics could be fused with artistic innovation, across diverse media, to retool the sexist conventions of figuration and upend the presumed objectivity of formalism. Rachel Middleman is Associate Professor of Art History at California State University, Chico, where she teaches courses in modern, contemporary, and American art history. She is the author of Radical Eroticism: Women, Art, and Sex in the 1960s (University of California Press, 2018), which was supported by a Smithsonian American Art Museum Postdoctoral Fellowship. Her current research and recent publications focus on topics of women artists, feminist art, and the politics of legacy. She serves as the executor of feminist artist Anita Steckel’s estate.

+

18:00
Difference Festival- Astrobiology: The Hunt for Alien Life

University of Westminster:University of Westminster - Regent Campus, UG04, 309 Regent St, London, W1B 2HW

event

Astrobiology: The Hunt for Alient Life

18:15
What to believe in a post-truth world

Royal Holloway:Founder's Building

event

These days we inhabit a ‘post-truth’ world where scientific evidence and accurate information must compete with populist appeals to emotion, ‘fake news’ and ‘alternative facts’. In this lecture Professor McKay will attempt to shed some light on the human propensity to adopt false beliefs. In some cases, false beliefs may be seductive because their content is compelling, perhaps because it appeals to deeply entrenched prejudices. Humans are more inclined to accommodate evidence if it fits our preconceptions and preferences. In other cases, we may be influenced by the status – or sheer number – of others who endorse the belief. In an era where dubious claims are routinely propagated by highly visible individuals, it is little wonder that misbeliefs about empirical reality persist in the face of contrary scientific evidence.

+

25

Tuesday

12:00

Stem cells @ lunch - Dr Nathan Hawkshaw and Professor Susan Kimber

Kings College: Guy’s Hospital, Guy’s Campus

event

Haircycle, skin inflammation Speaker: Dr Nathan Hawkshaw, Division of Musculoskeletal & Dermatological Sciences, University of Manchester.   Human embronic development, embryonic stem cells Speaker: Professor Susan Kimber, Division of Cell Matrix Biology & Regenerative Medicine, University of Manchester.

14:00

Electronic Resources

Guildhall Library: Guildhall Library, Aldermanbury, London, EC2V 7HH

event

This session is aimed at people who would like to learn about our biographical, family history and London digital resources.

14:00

‘Where does all the time go?’ – a surface and depth study of three social work teams to identify what impedes or supports reflective practice for managers and team members

Kings College: Virginia Woolf Building, Strand Campus

event

A seminar led by Judy Foster, Visiting lecturer, Tavistock Centre. Attendance at this seminar is by invitation only.

17:00

The New Enclosure and Beyond: Neoliberalism and the Privatisation of Land

SOAS: Russell Square: College Buildings Room: Djam Lecture Theatre (DLT)

event

In my 2018 book The New Enclosure, I examined the UK privatisation that previously nobody knew about: the privatisation of public land. Since the beginning of the 1980s, land equating to roughly 10 percent of Britain by area and worth in today’s prices somewhere in the region of £400 billion has been sold by the state – on dubious grounds and with calamitous consequences. In this talk, I will recap the main arguments of the book. But I will also endeavor to peer beyond the particular place (Britain) and time (the past 40 years) with which the book is preoccupied: to other parts of the world, where land is also being widely privatised, or where its potential privatisation is frequently mooted; and to the future, which, more than anything else, will be the age of climate change, an issue that it is impossible to think meaningfully about except in relation to land, its use, and its ownership. Brett Christophers is Professor of Human Geography at Uppsala University, Sweden, and the author of several books. Rentier Capitalism is forthcoming with Verso in 2020.

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17:15

States of Flux: Landscape and Identity in Modern Khaleeji Art

SOAS: Faber Building, 23/24 Russell Square Room: FG08

event

This seminar will examine artists' reactions to the evolving regional landscape in 20th-century Khaleeji art. The Gulf region has experienced an ongoing modernisation process enhanced by wealth acquired from the cultivation of oil. This wealth has enabled an unprecedented building boom in the growing Gulf capitals and rural landscapes. Artist responses include practices focused on the landscape, demonstrating a concern for the environment, for foreign labourers and for the question of ownership over evolving public spaces. Both modern and contemporary examples will be discussed, including practices of land art, performance art and new media as well as painting practices preceding the establishment of Gulf nation states. Landscape art collectives such as the Qatari based ‘Three Friends’, the Bahraini based ‘Manama Group’, as well as landscape practices by artists from Oman, Kuwait, the United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia.

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17:30

Do the Women of ISIS Deserve Rights?

SOAS: Russell Square: College Buildings Room: Khalili Lecture Theatre (KLT)

event

Book a place Abstract

17:30

What Does Success Look Like When There's No Audience? *CANCELLED*

:

event

Fringe and Underground Music Group panel with Mariam Rezaei, David Howcroft, Bryony Beynon, Stephen Graham, John Harries and Rose Dagul.

18:00

Difference Festival - Seeking the Grail: The Quest for Scientific Truth

University of Westminster: University of Westminster - Regent Campus, 117 Boardroom, 309 Regent St, London, W1B 2HW

event

Seeking the Grail: Why the Quest for Scientific Truth is Unending

18:00

Thomas Becket and London

Gresham College: Mercers' Hall

event

‘St Thomas has adorned…London by his rising and Canterbury by his setting’. This lecture will explore how the influence of Thomas Becket permeated city life in medieval London until Henry VIII ordered the destruction of his shrine and the removal of his name from all liturgical books. It will include consideration of the first stone bridge over the Thames made possible by offerings in the chapel dedicated to him; the hospital in Southwark; and the Becket family home in Cheapside (later the hall of the Mercers’ Company).This lecture is ticketed There will be no tickets available on the door For school bookings, please contact us at enquiries@gresham.ac.uk

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18:00

[CANCELLED] Esther Shalev-Gerz: Between ‘The Shadow’ and ‘The Monument against Fascism’

The Courtauld Institute of Art: Lecture Theatre 1, first floor, The Courtauld Institute of Art, Vernon Square, Penton Rise, King’s Cross, London, WC1X 9EW

event:book

Due to UCU industrial action beginning Thursday 20th February and ending on Friday 13th March, our events programme is subject to change, including cancellation. This event is cancelled.   How does landscape’s history mutate our vision? How can we place the legacy of the past in the present and create new forms of memorial? How can the contemporaneity of the witnesses’ words be made audible today? How can the artist inspire a society to address violence without repeating it in the means chosen to represent it? Sculptures and monument  such as  The Shadow, 2018, The Gold Room, 2016, Tissage d’Europe, 2006-2009, Between Listening and Telling: Last Witnesses, 2005, Daedal(us), 2003 and The Monument against Fascism, 1986 will be discussed in Esther Shalev-Gerz’s presentation. She appears as an ‘awakener’ who invites us to feel and witness the experience of the Other by shifting preconceived notions about how we perceive reality and by acting  out our mythology here and now. Based in Paris, Esther Shalev-Gerz is internationally recognized for her contributions to the field of art in the public realm and her consistent investigation into the construction of memory, history, the natural world, democracy and cultural identities. Her works challenge the notion and practice of portraiture and consider how its qualities may contribute to contemporary discourses around the politics of representation. She has exhibited internationally in San Francisco, Paris, Berlin, Vancouver, Finland, Detroit, Geneva, Guangzhou and New York and created permanent projects in public spaces in Hamburg, Galilee, Stockholm, Knislinge, Geneva, Glasgow and now Vancouver. Significant retrospective exhibitions were presented at the Serlachius Museum, Mantta, Finland (2017), Wasserman Projects, Detroit (2016), the Musée des Beaux Arts de Lausanne (2012) and Jeu de Paume, Paris (2010). Shalev-Gerz’s work has been represented in over twenty-five monographs. See  www.shalev-gerz.net The talk will be followed by a drinks reception

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12:00
Stem cells @ lunch - Dr Nathan Hawkshaw and Professor Susan Kimber

Kings College:Guy’s Hospital, Guy’s Campus

event

Haircycle, skin inflammation Speaker: Dr Nathan Hawkshaw, Division of Musculoskeletal & Dermatological Sciences, University of Manchester.   Human embronic development, embryonic stem cells Speaker: Professor Susan Kimber, Division of Cell Matrix Biology & Regenerative Medicine, University of Manchester.

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14:00
Electronic Resources

Guildhall Library:Guildhall Library, Aldermanbury, London, EC2V 7HH

event

This session is aimed at people who would like to learn about our biographical, family history and London digital resources.

14:00
‘Where does all the time go?’ – a surface and depth study of three social work teams to identify what impedes or supports reflective practice for managers and team members

Kings College:Virginia Woolf Building, Strand Campus

event

A seminar led by Judy Foster, Visiting lecturer, Tavistock Centre. Attendance at this seminar is by invitation only.

17:00
The New Enclosure and Beyond: Neoliberalism and the Privatisation of Land

SOAS:Russell Square: College Buildings Room: Djam Lecture Theatre (DLT)

event

In my 2018 book The New Enclosure, I examined the UK privatisation that previously nobody knew about: the privatisation of public land. Since the beginning of the 1980s, land equating to roughly 10 percent of Britain by area and worth in today’s prices somewhere in the region of £400 billion has been sold by the state – on dubious grounds and with calamitous consequences. In this talk, I will recap the main arguments of the book. But I will also endeavor to peer beyond the particular place (Britain) and time (the past 40 years) with which the book is preoccupied: to other parts of the world, where land is also being widely privatised, or where its potential privatisation is frequently mooted; and to the future, which, more than anything else, will be the age of climate change, an issue that it is impossible to think meaningfully about except in relation to land, its use, and its ownership. Brett Christophers is Professor of Human Geography at Uppsala University, Sweden, and the author of several books. Rentier Capitalism is forthcoming with Verso in 2020.

+

17:15
States of Flux: Landscape and Identity in Modern Khaleeji Art

SOAS:Faber Building, 23/24 Russell Square Room: FG08

event

This seminar will examine artists' reactions to the evolving regional landscape in 20th-century Khaleeji art. The Gulf region has experienced an ongoing modernisation process enhanced by wealth acquired from the cultivation of oil. This wealth has enabled an unprecedented building boom in the growing Gulf capitals and rural landscapes. Artist responses include practices focused on the landscape, demonstrating a concern for the environment, for foreign labourers and for the question of ownership over evolving public spaces. Both modern and contemporary examples will be discussed, including practices of land art, performance art and new media as well as painting practices preceding the establishment of Gulf nation states. Landscape art collectives such as the Qatari based ‘Three Friends’, the Bahraini based ‘Manama Group’, as well as landscape practices by artists from Oman, Kuwait, the United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia.

+

17:30
Do the Women of ISIS Deserve Rights?

SOAS:Russell Square: College Buildings Room: Khalili Lecture Theatre (KLT)

event

Book a place Abstract

17:30
What Does Success Look Like When There's No Audience? *CANCELLED*

:

event

Fringe and Underground Music Group panel with Mariam Rezaei, David Howcroft, Bryony Beynon, Stephen Graham, John Harries and Rose Dagul.

18:00
Difference Festival - Seeking the Grail: The Quest for Scientific Truth

University of Westminster:University of Westminster - Regent Campus, 117 Boardroom, 309 Regent St, London, W1B 2HW

event

Seeking the Grail: Why the Quest for Scientific Truth is Unending

18:00
Thomas Becket and London

Gresham College:Mercers' Hall

event

‘St Thomas has adorned…London by his rising and Canterbury by his setting’. This lecture will explore how the influence of Thomas Becket permeated city life in medieval London until Henry VIII ordered the destruction of his shrine and the removal of his name from all liturgical books. It will include consideration of the first stone bridge over the Thames made possible by offerings in the chapel dedicated to him; the hospital in Southwark; and the Becket family home in Cheapside (later the hall of the Mercers’ Company).This lecture is ticketed There will be no tickets available on the door For school bookings, please contact us at enquiries@gresham.ac.uk

+

18:00
[CANCELLED] Esther Shalev-Gerz: Between ‘The Shadow’ and ‘The Monument against Fascism’

The Courtauld Institute of Art:Lecture Theatre 1, first floor, The Courtauld Institute of Art, Vernon Square, Penton Rise, King’s Cross, London, WC1X 9EW

event:book

Due to UCU industrial action beginning Thursday 20th February and ending on Friday 13th March, our events programme is subject to change, including cancellation. This event is cancelled.   How does landscape’s history mutate our vision? How can we place the legacy of the past in the present and create new forms of memorial? How can the contemporaneity of the witnesses’ words be made audible today? How can the artist inspire a society to address violence without repeating it in the means chosen to represent it? Sculptures and monument  such as  The Shadow, 2018, The Gold Room, 2016, Tissage d’Europe, 2006-2009, Between Listening and Telling: Last Witnesses, 2005, Daedal(us), 2003 and The Monument against Fascism, 1986 will be discussed in Esther Shalev-Gerz’s presentation. She appears as an ‘awakener’ who invites us to feel and witness the experience of the Other by shifting preconceived notions about how we perceive reality and by acting  out our mythology here and now. Based in Paris, Esther Shalev-Gerz is internationally recognized for her contributions to the field of art in the public realm and her consistent investigation into the construction of memory, history, the natural world, democracy and cultural identities. Her works challenge the notion and practice of portraiture and consider how its qualities may contribute to contemporary discourses around the politics of representation. She has exhibited internationally in San Francisco, Paris, Berlin, Vancouver, Finland, Detroit, Geneva, Guangzhou and New York and created permanent projects in public spaces in Hamburg, Galilee, Stockholm, Knislinge, Geneva, Glasgow and now Vancouver. Significant retrospective exhibitions were presented at the Serlachius Museum, Mantta, Finland (2017), Wasserman Projects, Detroit (2016), the Musée des Beaux Arts de Lausanne (2012) and Jeu de Paume, Paris (2010). Shalev-Gerz’s work has been represented in over twenty-five monographs. See  www.shalev-gerz.net The talk will be followed by a drinks reception

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